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Thread: Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

  1. #21
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    Sounds like the bike shop could have done a better job but the real issue is that you bought a bike with a lot of hidden issues I would say.
    Where did you buy the bike in the first place?

    If you want something reliable and aren't capable to wrench I would stay away from the import models and just buy a Japanese scooter that any shop knows how to work on.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanviking View Post
    Sounds like the bike shop could have done a better job but the real issue is that you bought a bike with a lot of hidden issues I would say.
    Where did you buy the bike in the first place?

    If you want something reliable and aren't capable to wrench I would stay away from the import models and just buy a Japanese scooter that any shop knows how to work on.
    Yep. Exactly right. I basically didn't know what I was doing with the bike in the first place and helped screw myself.

    It was more the changing stories, and constant attempts at covering their arse that annoyed me.

    Next bike will be definitely a local.

  3. #23
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    Default Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

    Craigslist, second hand 50cc scooters go for about 40,000 Yen. You could just buy another one if it breaks down, do that three times and you would still have been better off.


    ....The same thing we do every night Pinky. Try to take over the world!
    RedSquare
    Some pithy saying about biking, or a quote from a self-styled guru. Take your pick.

  4. #24
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    Craigslist, second hand 50cc scooters go for about 40,000 Yen. You could just buy another one if it breaks down, do that three times and you would still have been better off.
    Yep. Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

  5. #25
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    Default Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

    That's Captain Hindsight to you.


    ....The same thing we do every night Pinky. Try to take over the world!
    RedSquare
    Some pithy saying about biking, or a quote from a self-styled guru. Take your pick.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by BikesvsChildren View Post
    Warning: Bike Shop Okamura - Futakotamagawa, Tokyo.

    Just a heads up about a crappy experience I had with this Italian scooter shop in Futakotamagawa.

    TL:DR - Asked a Malaguti dealer for an honest appraisal of a used bike I’d bought. Got completely shafted instead.


    I bought a used 2010 Malaguti Blog 125 as my very first bike. It seemed to be in pretty good condition, but ran into a few problems almost straight away.

    After replacing the ECU (50,000yen!) at my local bike shop, the owner recommended I take the bike to a Malaguti dealer for any future repairs.

    Luckily this shop was near my work, and I'd been in a few times window shopping. They had several new Malaguti's for sale ad promised they knew this bike and could look after it ok.

    First impression was really good. They were friendly and helpful. As I was a bit concerned about the bike, as I don't have much mechanical knowledge about scooters, and was a bit worried I'd bought a lemon, so I asked them to check the bike thoroughly and give me a report on it's condition.

    They came back and said that it needed a bit of routine maintenance (spark plugs, weight rollers, brake pads etc) but was otherwise ok. They said the repairs would cost about 55,000 but after that the bike should be fine. They said they'd give it a full check and as far as they could tell it should be fine.

    Satisfied I gave them the go-ahead. Got my bike back a few days later and it seemed fine.

    Then after getting the bike back, after about 20 minutes of riding the temperature gauge would suddenly shoot up to “hot”. The first few times weren’t too bad, but then one day the gauge shot up into the red and green coolant starts spraying out

    Sent the bike off on a truck, and my wife got on the phone and was pretty annoyed. They apologized and said they'd check it out.

    They had the bike for another few days and diagnosed a thermal regulator as being the cause of the problems. Wanted 10,000 yen to fix it.

    I questioned them about the value of repairing the bike, and again they promised that after this it would be fine. I asked them to check it completely because if there were any other potential problems looming I would trade it on a newer bike.

    They promised it was a good bike.

    Pick up the bike after work, get 15 minutes into my ride home, and suddenly the temperature gauge shoots up and my gloves are covered in green fluid.

    Pull into a 7/11 parking lot and try and call them, but they'd already gone home. The next day was their day off. Got the bike home, and when they opened up again on Thursday they got an incredibly angry phone call from my wife.

    Sent the bike off on a truck again. This time they diagnosed the problem as being a blown head gasket, a rooted water pump, and a few other things.

    When I confronted them about the bike, they said they hadn't checked those parts, and that it had been badly repaired in the past. How they missed this during the previous two inspections is beyond me.

    They promised to fix it for cost price, but still somehow ended up being another 43,000 yen. Again I asked them to check the bike with fine tooth comb and let me know if they find any problems.

    I got a loaner scooter, and they had the bike for 2 weeks fixing everything.

    Finally pick up the bike, and everything looks good. They promised that they had checked everything, and now it should be fine.

    Unfortunately I forgot to check the operation of the lights, but everything else was ok. Took it on a long test ride and it was fine.

    Get the bike home and ride it for a few days, but the fuel economy has gone to shit, and the rear wheel started making a squealing sound. Then I do my first night ride and notice both the tail lights are out.

    Take it back. They swear that the lights were working when they gave it to me. But I ask them to check it while I'm watching them. They unscrew the sealed assembly and neither light has been connected, and parts are missing. Parts that I know had been their previously as I'd replaced one of the bulbs when I bought the bike.

    They made some b.s excuse about it "falling out" (not possible) but promised to fix it.

    They then looked at rear brake for about 1 minute. The owner says "it's probably the brake rotor" He then said "that shouldn't fail at only 14,000 k's, so you bike has probably had it's speedo wound back, which why it's so unreliable". At which point I blew my own head gasket.

    They'd been asked to give condition reports 3 times. They'd charged me a fortune to change the brake pads, yet after looking at a squeaky wheel for 1 minute they determined the bike had been tampered with. How they'd missed this the three other times, and while changing the brakes was simply beyond comprehension.

    After few intense conversations they agreed that they would fix it for free.

    When picking up the bike later that night I got the mechanic on his own and asked him his opinion and he said that he'd told the owner the bike was trouble and not in great condition. I don't know if he was scared of me, and trying to deflect the blame, but he seemed like he was telling the truth.

    So I'm basically out over 150,000 in total repairs on an old bike, that I'd asked for an honest appraisal of 3 times. Yet each time they bs'd me probably hoping I'd keep coming back for repairs.

    Stay away.
    You did not say where you bought the bike from in first place. Also,
    if it were me, i would claim back to the original seller and see if they
    would not compensate you in some way. The dealer had no idea the bike
    was a lemon, but should have copped on after the 2nd engine problem.
    Sounds like they also needed to accept responsibility for their mistakes.

    Anyway, not nice to hear customers having such problems with bikes and hope your
    next experience is much more pleasant.
    Apexmoto Inc - Dyno tuning, engine/chassis/suspension upgrades, repairs, shaken, tires & changing with balancing, graphics printing, stickers, media blasting, painting & powder coating.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSquare View Post
    That's Captain Hindsight to you.

  8. #28
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    You did not say where you bought the bike from in first place. Also,
    if it were me, i would claim back to the original seller and see if they
    would not compensate you in some way.
    Can't at the moment unfortunately, as that's being sorted out.

    The dealer had no idea the bike
    was a lemon, but should have copped on after the 2nd engine problem.
    Sounds like they also needed to accept responsibility for their mistakes.
    Exactly. I don't hold them responsible for the bike being an absolute lemon. That's on me for buying it, and on the person that sold it to me for selling it.

    The reason I posted this, is because they constantly changed their story to cover their backside.

    They were asked to check the whole bike before even the first service and give a condition report. My wife made the request in Japanese and they gave her the report in Japanese, so there were no communication problems.

    Yet when the bike broke down a few days after the service (with something that hadn't been an issue before) they claimed that they hadn't checked those parts.

    Then after the initial repairs (that didn't fix the problem, leaving me stranded 1/2 way home) they claimed that the problem had been solved when they test rode the bike. Yet, when the problem occurred it was after 15 minutes of riding exactly as it had before, so they definitely didn't test ride it long enough to make sure the problem was actually fixed before giving it back to me.

    Then they claim the problem is related to a previous repair, by a previous owner that was done incorrectly.

    Then before the third repair, they were asked to thoroughly check the bike, which they claim they did (and had photos of bike stripped down to prove it), yet when there were yet more (albeit minor) problems after the third repairs they look at the brake rotor for about 2 minutes, and suddenly start claiming that the bike has had it's clock wound back, and that parts had fallen off in the few days since I got the bike back.

    The story kept changing. The excuses kept coming, and the quality of their repair work left a lot to be desired. That's why people should avoid them.

  9. #29
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    KTM Kobe is great! They have one of the best KTM mechanics in Japan as their manager, Yamashika-san. Service rates and parts rates are fair and comparable to big four bike shops. Several of us in Kansai have dealt with Yamashika-san on fixing bikes we bought from the pro auction and we are all in agreement that he is DA MAN when it comes to tuning and diagnosing problems with KTM bikes.

    KTM Kita Osaka is terrible. This shop opened in November 2014. They seem to only be interested in selling new bikes and dont have a competent mechanic on staff. I asked them about fixing a bogging and stalling issue on my 2004 125 EXC and they called Yamashika-san at KTM Kobe and asked him to fix it! I could have done that myself!

    I went in to get a lightweight replacement battery and was told they were not sure if it would fit a 2014 and if it didnt fit, it would be my problem. Why the hell would I order it from a shop and pay full shop retail if they cant check that if it will fit my bike or not. Ordered it from KTM Kobe over the phone with crap Japanese skills no drama. Went in to get the battery at KTM Kobe and tried to order a right side mirror bracket, but they had one in stock!

    I ve had other small experiences with KTM Kita Osaka with them not knowing basic things and not offering to check into it. I was taught that if you dont know something you look it up and learn when i was in retail!!!! Its a real shame as this place is only 5 minutes from home but I make the effort to go all the way to KTM Kobe.

    Honda Dream Takatsuki is a great shop. The chief mechanic there is a super nice guy and very knowledgeable.

    Mitsuoka Motorrad in Ibaraki, Osaka is a great shop. Tom Higuchi the manager is happy to speak English.


  10. #30
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    I have had hit and miss with shops, local garage in Kokubunji, Powerband, was always great. Kimura San is friendly and a good mech. Coffee while you wait, and possible the cutest miniature dachshund on earth.

    There is a honda dealer near me, went in there to get an sump plug washer, before I got through the door, I got the crossed arms saying dame dame, no engrish. Told them I can speak japanese, said I needed a sump washer, again in engrish, no dame, Japan bike only. I am on a street triple r.

    Called him a dick and left.
    Can't remember the shop name, is around mizonokuchi. Moto Pit, maybe.

    These have to be at each extreme of the spectrum.

  11. #31
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    Moto Pit near Mukougaokayuen??

    I do maintenance myself, but have used them for insurance. My Japanese is not perfect and I never had a problem with their attitude. A friend with an Aprillia often gets maintenance work done there and even had a full overhaul done. He gets work done on a non-Japanese scooter there too. He has never mentioned any complaints about them to me. I have always found them courteous.

  12. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adeonhisown View Post
    I have had hit and miss with shops, local garage in Kokubunji, Powerband, was always great. Kimura San is friendly and a good mech. Coffee while you wait, and possible the cutest miniature dachshund on earth.
    Cheers mate, I ride past here almost every day, and have often wondered about their service. Good info.

  13. #33
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    Default Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

    Quote Originally Posted by pigpen View Post
    Cheers mate, I ride past here almost every day, and have often wondered about their service. Good info.
    There are two shops the one on the main road near, Nishi-Kokubunji station, thatis fine and all, More profesional, but no dog. The owner lives in an house around the corner near the Inagaya supermarket the garage is downstairs, they mostly deal with dirt bikes. But they will do anything.

    Like I said nice family run place.

  14. #34
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    Default Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

    Quote Originally Posted by Adeonhisown View Post
    There are two shops the one on the main road near, Nishi-Kokubunji station, thatis fine and all, More profesional, but no dog. The owner lives in an house around the corner near the Inagaya supermarket the garage is downstairs, they mostly deal with dirt bikes. But they will do anything.

    Like I said nice family run place.
    Not sure if that is the one, I ride past it on my way from kosugi to Tachikawa. It is on the corner near a Nissan (maybe toyota) showroom. Don't pay attention to road names or signs.

    Maybe I caught them on an off day. But like I said, I parked in the family mart car park next door, walked in to "sorry no English", which did put my back up. Asked whether they have parts or can do maintenance on triumphs. They answered no, japanese bikes only. I didn't even bother furthering, I just said fine I'll find somewhere else. All in Japanese.

    (Will be honest I only called him a dick under my breath.)
    Quote Originally Posted by oi oi oi View Post
    Moto Pit near Mukougaokayuen??

    I do maintenance myself, but have used them for insurance. My Japanese is not perfect and I never had a problem with their attitude. A friend with an Aprillia often gets maintenance work done there and even had a full overhaul done. He gets work done on a non-Japanese scooter there too. He has never mentioned any complaints about them to me. I have always found them courteous.

  15. #35
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    Does anyone know a good repair shop near Ogikubo station for a VTR250? I dropped my bike and bent the gear pedal and the alignment feels a little off. I think I'm just going to get that fixed.

  16. #36
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    Default Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

    Drop by Funtech. Speak to George.
    https://goo.gl/maps/vNka7cuDVMR2

  17. #37
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    Thanks I'll check it out when I get a chance.

  18. #38
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    HELLO FOR ALL RIDERS HERE.
    living life here very long and owned more then 30 different bikes almost all big bikes...till now.
    I had learn that small bike shops are much easier and friendlier then big dealers shops.
    riding a bike is kind of personal thing that each one has his own style and needs, buying a bike can be focus on the bike itself ...or can be with business relationship with the bike dealer/shop/place...
    myself I choose buying bike only at place I feel comfortable and friendly, considering that bike needs treatment and after care service.
    from my own privet experience I will search first by distance how far the place from my place, then by human attitude and way they will welcome you or not.
    many small places wont be able to speak English but they will be much better with attitude and thankful approach.in other words.. old fashion business style is better, at least here in japan. last 4-5 years I ride KTM, took me some time to find the best place that I feel good with.
    sometimes we have to spend time waiting... while the bike get serviced and if that become an uncomfortable place to wait...then myself I rather choose different place.
    I highly RECOMMEND : KTM KAWASAKI CHUO,its on next to road 246 , 213-0013 Kawasaki shi,takatsu-ku suenaga 1 chome-52-24, tel: 044-984-7316
    KTM-KAWASAKICHUO.COM
    the owner has also a HONDA dealer shop just next to the KTM shop. he is super friendly open minded and polite, he cant speak English but he welcome gaijins as same as Japanese.
    the mechanic men there is super professional and also doing racing . hopefully this information can help you.
    IN CASE YOU CHOOSE GIVING A TRY...AND YOU NEEDS HELP WITH JAPANESE...ILL BE HAPPY TO HELP AND MEET YOU THERE ...
    my regards to all riders...safe ride.

    William.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by mevan123 View Post
    Drop by Funtech. Speak to George.
    https://goo.gl/maps/vNka7cuDVMR2
    I went here and this guy was great. Thank for you recommending him.

  20. #40
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    Default Good and bad dealerships and repair shops

    Quote Originally Posted by Time Mage View Post
    I went here and this guy was great. Thank for you recommending him.
    Cool! Glad to hear all went well! 😎👍

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