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Thread: Japan - India Overland Adventure

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    I didn't read the blog. Just got that guy's contact. Wll speak to him and get the exact details. I heard from someone that I have to pay 250 USD for one day in China. Have to confirm.

    And there's no way you can enter India from Afghanistan! It's off limit for civilians.

    Damn, I'm checkmate-d
    Yeah, I hadn't researched the India-Afghanistan border when I said that. Looks like a bad idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durand_...ntemporary_era

    Maybe you could get dual citizenship somewhere and use that passport to enter Pakistan?
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  2. #22
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    Another reason not to take a big bike on this trip (again, going from memory here) is that the money you have to put down as a deposit when you get a carnet is proportional to the value of the bike. So a $15,000 adventure behemoth is going to cost you a lot more in carnet deposits than a $5,000 small DP.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Jinbaiquerre View Post

    Maybe you could get dual citizenship somewhere and use that passport to enter Pakistan?
    Don't see that happening soon! But yeah, may be in the future, it sounds like a good option

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    And there's no way you can enter India from Afghanistan! It's off limit for civilians.

    Damn, I'm checkmate-d
    No one thought this would ever be possible until a bunch of Kiwi bikers tried it.

    http://www.gaijinriders.com/showthre...-ballsy-bikers

    Might be possible for you to pull off something similar? Who know...
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rider2371 View Post
    No one thought this would ever be possible until a bunch of Kiwi bikers tried it.

    http://www.gaijinriders.com/showthre...-ballsy-bikers

    Might be possible for you to pull off something similar? Who know...
    That will keep me hopeful! I still have almost 2 years before I start the journey. Who knows what's gonna happen. Keeping my fingers crossed!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Jinbaiquerre View Post
    Oh, we absolutely can. We just don't like to show off.
    i know you are joking but did you read the link that gkanai posted?!? it completely agrees with what i have been trying to tell you guys for years now!

    some choice sections:

    The reality is, as soon as you get off the asphalt, weight is a very very important issue. Lose 40 – 50 – 60 kgs and its a totally different experience, as the guy comparing his experiences between the F800 and the XC pointed out. Or as the guy comparing the amount of fun riders arriving in UB had on a 250 vs a 650 vs a 1200. The difference between suffering / enduring somewhere like Mongolia and really enjoying it, is 40-50-60 kgs in bike weight.

    There is a dual illusion perpetuated by the industry, including magazines, that (1) experienced riders ride big adventure bikes and (2) riding a bigger adventure bike makes you more of a man. The reality counterpunch to the first of those illusions is not surprisingly, exactly the opposite of the illusion. The more experienced an adventure rider, the lighter bike he is probably riding. Austin Vince, Chris Scott, Terry Brown, Mac Swinarski, Adam Lewis etc, all focus heavily on weight. These guys have been doing it for decades and are not obligated to any manufacturer or model. They get to choose their bikes and gear. Light bikes and soft luggage is the number one common theme among guys who have been doing it for years. So in fact, its almost only the naive Adventure Motorcycling first-timers or sponsored riders that take big bikes to the likes of Mongolia.
    like i am constantly saying, you can ride a big ADV bike on a lot of the rindos but it isnt really fun. it is a lot easier, more fun and enjoyable on a small DP bike!


  7. #27
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    Default Japan - India Overland Adventure

    I find the story of this guy pretty amazing. With almost zero motorcycle experience and pretty much on a whim he rode a CGL125 from Chile to the US.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Japan - India Overland Adventure

    Quote Originally Posted by rider2371 View Post
    No one thought this would ever be possible until a bunch of Kiwi bikers tried it.

    http://www.gaijinriders.com/showthre...-ballsy-bikers

    Might be possible for you to pull off something similar? Who know...
    The difference is, North Korea doesn't have any particular beef with New Zealand. An American could not have done that.

    In this case, Rakeshogi is from Pakistan's "enemy" country, so I doubt they'd make an exception for him.
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
    i know you are joking but did you read the link that gkanai posted?!? it completely agrees with what i have been trying to tell you guys for years now!
    I've always agreed with you. Just that most of our touring is on pavement, where big bikes are fun and comfortable. If I was touring through developing countries and backwater places like Siberia I'd definitely take my Djebel.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cash View Post
    I find the story of this guy pretty amazing. With almost zero motorcycle experience and pretty much on a whim he rode a CGL125 from Chile to the US.
    There are so many inspirational people out there! Thanks for this story

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twinrider View Post
    I've always agreed with you. Just that most of our touring is on pavement, where big bikes are fun and comfortable. If I was touring through developing countries and backwater places like Siberia I'd definitely take my Djebel.
    +1.

    For me, a big ADV bike is simply more fun and more comfortable than a DP bike on paved roads, be it local country backroads, highways or mountain twisties.

    On rindos and unpaved roads in general, no bike will beat a 250-400 DP.
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  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by rider2371 View Post
    +1.

    For me, a big ADV bike is simply more fun and more comfortable than a DP bike on paved roads, be it local country backroads, highways or mountain twisties.

    On rindos and unpaved roads in general, no bike will beat a 250-400 DP.
    get a DRZ400S while you still can, and set it up properly for comfortable ADV touring. it can hang on the expressway at reasonable speeds, fun on the street, fun on the backroads, a blast on the rindos! when you are only doing street touring, take your big touring bike. when you want to do some rindos, take your DRZ ADV bike!


  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
    get a DRZ400S while you still can, and set it up properly for comfortable ADV touring. it can hang on the expressway at reasonable speeds, fun on the street, fun on the backroads, a blast on the rindos! when you are only doing street touring, take your big touring bike. when you want to do some rindos, take your DRZ ADV bike!
    I've read great things about the DRZ. I did look at 400 DP for the above reasons, but decided in favor of 250 for long term costs (shaken, tax etc). And then Chozzer's CRF was up for grabs so I jumped on it.
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  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by rider2371 View Post
    I've read great things about the DRZ. I did look at 400 DP for the above reasons, but decided in favor of 250 for long term costs (shaken, tax etc). And then Chozzer's CRF was up for grabs so I jumped on it.
    the cost of ownership including shaken is about the same if you do user shaken instead of handing the shop your wallet to do it.

    sorry, but the CRF L weighs the same as a DRZ with about 1/3 less power, no wonder its not much fun on the street. sell that pig and get a DRZ!


  15. #35
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    Default Re: Japan - India Overland Adventure

    Quote Originally Posted by Twinrider View Post
    I've always agreed with you. Just that most of our touring is on pavement, where big bikes are fun and comfortable. If I was touring through developing countries and backwater places like Siberia I'd definitely take my Djebel.
    What he said. The little bikes are inarguably better-performing on uneven terrain. But he big bikes are great for riding long distances on pavement or flat dirt and gravel.

    Personally, I get backaches after a day or two on a 250cc DP bike. I don't know if I could handle riding one around the world for months and months (although I would like to).
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  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
    get a DRZ400S while you still can, and set it up properly for comfortable ADV touring. it can hang on the expressway at reasonable speeds, fun on the street, fun on the backroads, a blast on the rindos! when you are only doing street touring, take your big touring bike. when you want to do some rindos, take your DRZ ADV bike!
    About 10 years ago I toured Hokkaido on my CRM250R — which has the same power as a DRZ but is lighter — and it sucked big time. Part of it was my fault because I didn't have panniers so all my camping crap and other gear was piled up behind me on the seat and in the top box, making the bike really top heavy. But most of the problem was the weather. It rained nearly every day and it was about 15C in the daytime so I was cold, wet and miserable, with no weather protection. Kept kicking myself for not taking my VFR800, with its 110 HP, heated grips and nice fairing.

    No doubt a DRZ would be a fun bike to have though. I seriously thought about getting one but by the time I added a big tank, a big headlight, lowering links and a humane seat I was looking at spending well over 400,000. So I got my mint Djebel, which is pretty much already set up the way I wanted for 300,000. Didn't really want to spend more than that and the power is enough for its purpose...

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twinrider View Post
    About 10 years ago I toured Hokkaido on my CRM250R, which is lighter than a DRZ and has the same power, and it sucked big time. Part of it was my fault because I didn't have panniers so all my camping crap and other gear was piled up behind me on the seat and in the top box, making the bike really top heavy. But part of the problem was the weather. It rained nearly every day and it was about 15C in the day time so I was cold, wet and miserable, with no weather protection. Kept kicking myself for not taking my VFR800, with its 110 RWHP, heated grips and nice fairing...
    i just did hokkaido on the DRZ in similar rainy and cool conditions and was fine with it. i was prepared for the rain and cold, and had a good luggage system. a huge difference is that i went to a hotel at the end of the day whereas you camped in the miserable rain.


  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
    i just did hokkaido on the DRZ in similar rainy and cool conditions and was fine with it. i was prepared for the rain and cold, and had a good luggage system. a huge difference is that i went to a hotel at the end of the day whereas you camped in the miserable rain.
    No doubt a good luggage system and not camping in the rain day after day would have made it much better! But even so, being continually being pelted by rain on a naked bike got old fast. A few sunny days would have made a huge difference.

  19. #39
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    (The more experienced an adventure rider, the lighter bike he is probably riding.) So riding my 85kg HondaCT110 makes me super experienced??

    As far as posting in the HUBB for a 2015 ride, I don't think it's too soon, you can keep the thread alive by updating from time to time.
    Beware of the dreaded CARNET, and if $$$ are of any concern at all, get the cheapest most reliable bike you can comfortably live with. I've just done the CARNET for my little bike, and it's expensive. I believe India requires a CARNET to the tune of 450% of the value of the bike including tools and accessories. Of course you don't have to necessarily make a cash deposit for the full amount, but you will need to provide a bank guarantee or engage the services of an insurance agent. Both of those options will of course come at an extra cost. As an example, my little CT110 has a valuation from the local Honda Dealer here in Darwin of $800, the CARNET cost me $3760 of which I'll get all but $200 back so long as I abide by all of the requirements and get the documents signed into and out of every country.
    The organisation providing the CARNET will require a written valuation of the bike from a licensed trader, this is the base amount they use to calculate the final amount. It's in your interest to get the figure as low as possible. In my case when I asked for a valuation the guy in the shop wrote down $1500 so I asked him what that figure represented. He said it was the value of the bike, so I said fine, it's for sale, give me $1500 trade on a new 250. He offered me $800, so I said please put that in writing.
    You will need to do some research on the requirements of each country you intend to travel through, although India is the most expensive, or perhaps it's Egypt?

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtho View Post
    It's in your interest to get the figure as low as possible. In my case when I asked for a valuation the guy in the shop wrote down $1500 so I asked him what that figure represented. He said it was the value of the bike, so I said fine, it's for sale, give me $1500 trade on a new 250. He offered me $800, so I said please put that in writing.
    Nice....

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