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Thread: Japan - India Overland Adventure

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtho View Post
    (The more experienced an adventure rider, the lighter bike he is probably riding.) So riding my 85kg HondaCT110 makes me super experienced??
    to me it means you are well experienced and super intelligent!

    In my case when I asked for a valuation the guy in the shop wrote down $1500 so I asked him what that figure represented. He said it was the value of the bike, so I said fine, it's for sale, give me $1500 trade on a new 250. He offered me $800, so I said please put that in writing.
    awesome!


  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtho View Post
    As an example, my little CT110 has a valuation from the local Honda Dealer here in Darwin of $800, the CARNET cost me $3760 of which I'll get all but $200 back so long as I abide by all of the requirements and get the documents signed into and out of every country.
    Holy crap! FFS how much would a carnet cost those guys touring RTW on gixxers and GS's!! That's mad! Mad!
    ----------------
    2008 R1200GS | 2009 NSF100 | 2009 CRF250X | 2011 Address V125S


  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtho View Post
    In my case when I asked for a valuation the guy in the shop wrote down $1500 so I asked him what that figure represented. He said it was the value of the bike, so I said fine, it's for sale, give me $1500 trade on a new 250. He offered me $800, so I said please put that in writing.
    Mental bookmark

    Thanks for that
    ----------------
    2008 R1200GS | 2009 NSF100 | 2009 CRF250X | 2011 Address V125S


  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    And there's no way you can enter India from Afghanistan! It's off limit for civilians.

    Damn, I'm checkmate-d
    Is your goal to get to India via a particular route, or to get there through an interesting route? For there are other interesting routes.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthbyNW View Post
    Is your goal to get to India via a particular route, or to get there through an interesting route? For there are other interesting routes.
    The goal is to reach India overland. No particular route in mind. I have been told by someone to try out the South East Asian route. So, i'm still thinking.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    The goal is to reach India overland. No particular route in mind. I have been told by someone to try out the South East Asian route. So, i'm still thinking.
    I was thinking that as well. You could gain a lot of valuable experience that would be useful for a longer, more challenging RTW trip in the future.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    The goal is to reach India overland. No particular route in mind. I have been told by someone to try out the South East Asian route. So, i'm still thinking.
    Now Myanmar's in the equation! :) IF you are allowed in!! I would look into getting some help in obtaining the proper permits. Refer to my earlier suggested web-site re. Myanmar ride-reports and associated red tape. If I were you, ie. travelling with an Indian passport, I would avoid Pakistan and Afghanistan at all costs! Just my take though, we all have different levels of tolerances, read 'risk-taking'. :)

  8. #48
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    Got the contact of a bunch of Indians who drove from Singapore to India via Myanmar! Will speak to them and get the route suggestion and post here. One fellow told me that he can arrange permits for me in Myanmar!

    A big twist to the tale. Getting closer and closer to reality :-)

  9. #49
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    Talking

    Some research findings:

    The Indian Govt. seems to have some kind of pact with the ASEAN countries and the Indian external ministry organizes a Singapore to New Delhi car rally every year!

    The route is:



    I thought about it and I think this is the WAY to go. Of course, I am gonna go on a motorcycle and not take part in the car rally. Why this route over the earlier one?

    1. The Russia-Iran route comes out to be almost 20K kms which is a freaking lot! Whereas this is around 10K kms, kind of a natural progression from my 4000kms
    Himalayan trip.
    2. I would be riding through some of the more populated regions than Russia which means, it may be much safer. I wouldn't have to camp in jungles. Myanmar is an issue though but I guess I will get escort from the military junta. (Don't know details yet.)
    3. I've always wanted to explore the North East regions of India. It's almost never traveled to by the "mainland" people. This trip would put me right there!
    4. Unlike the weather issue in Russia, these regions, being close to the Equator, don't really have a cold winter. So, it's not a seasonal ride (I think.) It's gonna rain badly in those areas though.

    I think Singbiker is the one to contact for the details around these areas. Also, Java-Guy's link would come in handy. Thanks mate!

    Now, I have to figure out if I have to buy a bike (a DRZ ) in Japan or can I just rent one in Singapore. Not sure how to work out the international number plate registration for rental bikes. More research to be done there!

    Thanks a lot for the suggestions guys!

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    Some research findings:
    4. Unlike the weather issue in Russia, these regions, being close to the Equator, don't really have a cold winter. So, it's not a seasonal ride (I think.) It's gonna rain badly in those areas though.
    My understanding is that Nov-March is more pleasant for that area. My only exp in that region is Thailand. Was there in August and thought it miserable. See what you find out.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshogi View Post
    2. I'm almost '0' at motorcycle maintenance. I have done some hands-on work when in Univ but nothing much to write home about. So, I'm looking for someone who can guide me with basic motorcycle maintenance. . . .
    Rakesh
    I am also, uh, challenged in the maintenance department. I just came across this, though, in case it interests: Modern Motorcycle Technology by Massimo Clarke.

  12. #52
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    Mondo Enduro gives an interesting perspective on adventure riding, the absolute antithesis of Ewan and Charlie's LWR.

    Some good tips in these videos. Check out this one if you don't have much time:


    Or this one for the full 93 minutes of round the world adventure on a shoestring:
    "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then give up. There's no use in being a damn fool about it."
    W.C. Fields

  13. #53
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    Got this book yesterday. It's called "Adventure Motorcycling Handbook" by Chris Scott. Very well written and lots of info!
    Amazon link: http://goo.gl/sFk0xT

    And, I came across this RTW route while searching on the HUBB. Mostly "tarmac" based route. Seems like a RTW is very much possible with the two of the longest highways in the World: The Trans-Siberian Highway and the Trans-Canada Highway!

    Has anyone been on the Alaska Highway or the Dalton Highway?

    First Leg: Vladivostok (RUS) - Liverpool (UK)



    Second Leg: Halifax (CAN) - Anchorage (AK, USA)


  14. #54
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    Check Advrider ride reports, lots of people riding in Alaska on those roads.

  15. #55
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    I just logged onto GaijinRiders after about 3-4 years, and I found that I had posted this overland plan about 5 years ago.
    Guess what, I did something longer and more exciting this past summer.
    I rode from London to Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) on a 125 cc Yamaha commuter bike in about 45 days. It was one hell of a trip!
    I just want to thank everyone for all your inputs in this thread!

    Some quick notes:
    1. A lighter bike is definitely better. 125cc may not seem like too much power, but once you get to Central Asia or Mongolia, it is very manageable.
    2. Being a vegetarian wasn't much of an issue; surprisingly, it was easy to eat out and stay vegetarian on this trip.
    3. Travelling alone is not a problem at all. Having a small, non-imposing bike made me fit in better with the locals (brown skin helps too!). None tried to mug me.
    4. People are super friendly. My fuel pump motor died in the 45 C heat of Turkmenistan, but a bunch of smart locals found a Toyota's motor of similar dimensions and force fit it to my bike.
    5. I had mentioned 150 man yen in the plan above, but it costed me less than half of that. As long as you're willing to stay in hostels/tents, the expenses are very low. The major expenses are bike, visas, and flights.
    6. The weather was an issue. I went from 45 C to -5 C in a couple of days, but travelling smart and purchasing locally made life easy for me. Don't take a lot, just buy necessary things as you go.
    7. Language is no longer a big barrier. Google Translate makes things so easy.
    8. Motorcycle maintenance is not a big issue. Ok, I was lucky not to break down in the Pamirs, but there is always help at hand. Knowing basic maintenance is important, but no need to be an expert.

    In all, I would seriously encourage anyone to do an overland trip. You don't need too much experience to be honest, as long as you keep things simple.

    My full blog of pictures: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1&l=059db34735
    My trip's FB page: https://www.facebook.com/mongolrallym2m/

    Hope to come to Japan sometime to ride with you guys sometime!
    Best,
    Rakesh

  16. #56
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    Default Japan - India Overland Adventure

    Nice little write up thank you very much.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  17. #57

    Default Japan - India Overland Adventure

    Awesome, well done, and Iím jealous (in a nice way)!

  18. #58
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    Awesome. Adventure is never regretted (mostly :-))

  19. #59
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    Cool

    This is a really fun, and worth while to read thread. Thanks for posting/sharing. ❤️

  20. #60
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    Hi, really want to join in on this post and will read all the replies fully tomorrow only skimmed them this evening. As for the small bike theory I have to disagree, I did my long trip on an Xchallenge,650, motivated by Sibersky exstreme, Someone called Noah is is also doing a round world trip on a Kim 690. the thing is that you are doing the trip for the joy of riding a bike so you have to ride something that can thrill you. I was green with envy at people I meet on comfortable bikes on long stretches but I planned my ride to avoid long stretches where possible. I know someone who road a cub from Mongolia to Moscow, and he won't tell you straight but I know he regretted his choice of bike. Once you have your camping gear, food, fuel and water loaded you want to be controlling that weight with a powerful bike and not have you luggage dampen your ride. I also travelled alone but it took me a long time to build up to it and I did a Morocco trip as a warm up.

    I should say that I had one years experience riding my Xchallenge off road before I left, this was all part of the plan. You should get at least one years off road riding experience on your chosen bike.
    Last edited by rich 400; 08-04-18 at 06:45 PM.

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