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Thread: V-strom at Texas World Speedway

  1. #1
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    Default V-strom at Texas World Speedway

    This vid brought to mind Rick's recent track exploits at Infineon.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfyLR-HN1ys

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    Dude! I was looking for that TWS video, but I couldn't find it, thanks.

    On a tight technical track like Infineon, the V-Strom 650 really shined. The sweet V-twin motor pulls off the corners nice and clean, good torque from a 60-hp slightly detuned SV650 motor. With stock dual-sport Trail Wing tires and stock exhaust, no less. I have to stay, even in the COLD temps we had that day, those freaking Trail Wings performed well, with no scariness.

    The limited ground clearance was the only thing that made me miss my GSXR. I grinded the pegs at least once in T3, T4, T6, T7, T8, entering T9 chicane, exiting T9 chicane, and T11.

    I never ever expected to do any track days on the Strom when I bought this bike. Now I'm scratching my head wondering how an adventure-tourer could perform so well on a racetrack. 8)

    Also, this is the first time I've had a V-twin on a racetrack. Now I see how the V-twin fuckers have been cheating all these years, these things are SO easy to ride. You're always in the powerband, and why use the brake lever when the engine braking will almost launch you over the bars at downshifts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Dino
    Now I see how the V-twin fuckers have been cheating all these years, these things are SO easy to ride. You're always in the powerband, and why use the brake lever when the engine braking will almost launch you over the bars at downshifts?

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    that is true, having only taken my RC-51 on the track twice i cant really comment, but the powerband is wide thats for sure!!
    i regularly find myself downshifting from 1st to, eghm.... first. thinking i have more gears to play with than i do!!

    but there is nothing like that v twin feel.

    id love to check out the new ducati on the track at close to 160Bhp of v twin power and weight closing in on my GSX-R it must be a blast!!

    :badgrin:

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    its easy not to envious of american tracks. :razz:

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    Quote Originally Posted by theblob
    its easy not to envious of american tracks. :razz:
    But it's not easy to say.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Dino
    Now I see how the V-twin fuckers have been cheating all these years, these things are SO easy to ride. You're always in the powerband, and why use the brake lever when the engine braking will almost launch you over the bars at downshifts?
    Yep, try as I might it's hard to like inline 4s anymore....

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    why use the brake lever when the engine braking will almost launch you over the bars at downshifts?
    Hmmm.... I thought that article in Cycle World helped put this concept to rest. They tested engine braking in a variety of bikes and found that twins have less than fours.
    I wish to have no connection with any bike that does not ride fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solo
    why use the brake lever when the engine braking will almost launch you over the bars at downshifts?
    Hmmm.... I thought that article in Cycle World helped put this concept to rest. They tested engine braking in a variety of bikes and found that twins have less than fours.
    I don't know what they were smokin'.... My experience shows me that the twins I've ridden give massive engine braking, especially my BMWs, much more than my fizzy....

  10. #10
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    Twins certainly feel like they have more engine braking, but I would not be
    surprised if it was not the case. I learnt a long time ago that reality and
    perceived reality can be different.

    Such an example, though not concerning braking but acceleration, was when
    I raced my friend in his A9X. My 351 powered Ford did not feel as fast we
    both agreed, and there was no doubt that his car felt much faster. But
    when we finally did some drag racing the Ford would beat him every time.
    We swapped cars and the same result. In his car you felt pushed into the
    seat under hard acceleration, but in the Ford it was no where near as
    noticeable. Yet the 351 walked away every time.

    Jav
    Evolution is the religion of the 21 century. Proving people do not change............................ Jav

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    I don't know what they were smokin'.... My experience shows me that the twins I've ridden give massive engine braking, especially my BMWs, much more than my fizzy....
    BUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA :razz:

    anyway when you get down to high performance its not like engine braking is a good thing. the whole point of slipper clutches is to remove the engine as a source of braking...

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    Quote Originally Posted by theblob
    I don't know what they were smokin'.... My experience shows me that the twins I've ridden give massive engine braking, especially my BMWs, much more than my fizzy....
    BUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA :razz:

    anyway when you get down to high performance its not like engine braking is a good thing. the whole point of slipper clutches is to remove the engine as a source of braking...
    Wrong, the whole point of slipper clutches is to stop lock up while allowing
    engine braking.

    Jav
    Evolution is the religion of the 21 century. Proving people do not change............................ Jav

  13. #13
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    ummm no.
    the whole point of slipper clutches is to remove engine braking from the equation of braking. of course the balance of a motorcycle is reliant on the engine revolving so the there must be a balance struck. to allow a rider to enter the corner whilst still in the braking phase of the operation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theblob
    ummm no.
    the whole point of slipper clutches is to remove engine braking from the equation of braking. of course the balance of a motorcycle is reliant on the engine revolving so the there must be a balance struck. to allow a rider to enter the corner whilst still in the braking phase of the operation.
    Tripe. If that were the case they would completely engage the clutch
    so that the engine had no braking effect. I do not know of a slipper clutch
    on any production bike that does that, and from what I read on MotoGP
    they set the slip to the riders preference and most seem to prefer slip
    than zip...................

    Jav.
    Evolution is the religion of the 21 century. Proving people do not change............................ Jav

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    I don't know what they were smokin'.... My experience shows me that the twins I've ridden give massive engine braking, especially my BMWs, much more than my fizzy....
    Like Jav mentions, seat of the pants ain't the best test.

    It seems that the heavier flywheel of the twins keeps the innards of the engines turning more than the lighter flywheel of the fours.

    I'm fortunate that I can swap back and forth between a four and a twin. In doing so I've noticed if I ride the twin like a four, I get a huge amount of engine braking. If I avoid an "extra downshift" on the twin, I get what feels like the same pull out of the corner but less engine braking going in, duh...

    Anyway, if memory serves, the cycle world test included a variety bikes being hauled down by their engine braking alone with a laser or radar speed gun and some onboard data measuring devices doing the checking. Turns out the fours (R1 and R6) had the most engine braking. Example was first gear where the engine had the same effect as stomping on the rear brake.

    The bike with the least engine braking: An RD350
    I wish to have no connection with any bike that does not ride fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solo
    [In doing so I've noticed if I ride the twin like a four, I get a huge amount of engine braking. If I avoid an "extra downshift" on the twin, I get what feels like the same pull out of the corner but less engine braking going in, duh...
    That's what I meant by twins being so easy to ride. The fours need the extra downshift to keep the revs screaming high in the fat part of the powerband. V-twins don't need the extra downshift, just stay one gear higher and let the strong midrange pull you out of the corner. Lazy bastards!

    The last time I rode at Infineon was 2005 on my GSXR750, so in the first session on the 650 I was trying to ride the Strom like the Gixxer, and it was not working so well as I was downshifting too much. Then I started going into the corners one gear higher and it smoothed things out nicely.

    I've talked to other racers who did the swap in the other direction, and it's a more difficult transition to go from the V-twin to the inline four. Extra shifting and higher RPMs entering the corner require more precise throttle control IHMO.

    Moral of the story: motorcycles are fun. :mrgreen:

  17. #17
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    Moral of the story: motorcycles are fun.
    :headbang:
    I wish to have no connection with any bike that does not ride fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.
    -John Solo Jones-

  18. #18
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    I forgot to mention, my race club's #1 plate holder the past two years is a former AMA racer, he got 7th place at the AMA Superbike race at Infineon a few years ago (think it was '04).

    Anyway he has a V-Strom 1000 streetbike, and took it out for a trackday awhile back, and I hear he hurt a lot of race-replica feelings.

    He also races inline fours and the last time I talked to him we were laughing about the stronger engine braking of V-twins. All you gotta do is roll out of the throttle on a V-twin and the bike slows dramatically, while a four wants to coast more.

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