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Thread: Buying casein & whey in Japan

  1. #41
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    Default Buying casein & whey in Japan

    Of course they do as its true ... As long as there's is some sensible dieting and exercise
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by the44secs View Post
    So when your goal is weight loss, it all essentially comes down to portion control.
    That doesn't actually have to be the case, if i may say so. It's entirely possible to eat until you're full three or four times a day and not put on weight. It depends on what you eat. Some foods are so calorically dense that you don't feel sated after eating them, i.e. processed foods, so you feel the need to eat more, whereas others are not as dense and fill you up, i.e. whole foods. For example, refined carbs have so much removed, such as fibre and water, then have fat, sugar and salt added, leaving them really calorically dense and actually addictive, but if you eat unrefined, whole food carbs, you're getting less calories but leaving you feeling sated, as well as providing you with dietary fibre, which, I may add, over 90% of US citizens aren't getting enough of. For all its complexity, the stomach is not equipped for the modern, processed foods diet. It doesn't understand the difference between a belly full of chocolate and a belly full of fruit in terms of their caloric density, only their bulk.

    I eat to full several times a day, plus snacks, but over 90% of what I eat is fresh produce prepared at home. I eat some snacks, usually once a day, but even then I box clever, for example, I've just had a feed of guacamole (home made) and saltine crackers. I had manju for my mid-afternoon snack. However, I eat unrefined carbs in every meal, and lots of them, and I'm the same weight I was when I was in my late-teens/early 20s.

    The problem with portion control diets is their unsustainability. Once you hit your desired weight, what next? You're in a pickle. You can't go back to eating the portions you used to. You can't eat less than that because you'll be hungry too often, putting you at risk of returning to the old habits. Therefore, a change to a sustainable diet is necessary, one that satisfies you in terms of nutrition, satiation and taste, and for that, you need to learn to cook.

    Here's one of the best articles on processed foods I've ever read. It takes a while, but it's absolutely worth the time.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/ma...food.html?_r=0


    Yamaha Vino 50cc (Sold), Honda Transalp 400V (Sold), Honda CB400 Super Bol D'or (Sold), Yamaha Serow XT225WE (Sold), 2005 Beta Rev 3 (Current) 2015 Yamaha Serow XT250 (Current)

  3. #43
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    I never eat to te point l feel full...there should be always a little "space" in the stomach ..

    This is interesting too..

    Many diet books advise people to chew slowly so they will feel full after eating less food than if they ate quickly. As we explain in the current issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter, eating slowly doesn’t always work, but when it does, the reason has as much to do with the brain as with the gut.

    Scientists have known for some time that a full stomach is only part of what causes someone to feel satisfied after a meal; the brain must also receive a series of signals from digestive hormones secreted by the gastrointestinal tract.

    Stretch receptors in the stomach are activated as it fills with food or water; these signal the brain directly through the vagus nerve that connects gut and brainstem. Hormonal signals are released as partially digested food enters the small intestine. One example is cholecystokinin (CCK), released by the intestines in response to food consumed during a meal. Another hormone, leptin, produced by fat cells, is an adiposity signal that communicates with the brain about long-range needs and satiety, based on the body’s energy stores. Research suggests that leptin amplifies the CCK signals, to enhance the feeling of fullness. Other research suggests that leptin also interacts with the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain to produce a feeling of pleasure after eating. The theory is that, by eating too quickly, people may not give this intricate hormonal cross-talk system enough time to work.

    Of course, as anyone who has tried eating slowly in order to lose weight can attest, it’s not quite that simple. People who are obese, for example, may suffer from leptin resistance, meaning that they are less responsive to satiety or pleasure signals from this hormone. People are also sensitive to cues in the environment — such as the alluring smell of chocolate chip cookies or the sight of a juicy burger — that can trigger the desire to eat.

    Appetite is complex, and dieting is a challenge. Even so, people who are trying to lose weight may want to start by chewing more slowly. In that way, they allow themselves enough time to experience pleasure and satiety.

  4. #44
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    All is possible if the goal is strong enough...you can choose how you want to be!!


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  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualta View Post
    That doesn't actually have to be the case, if i may say so. It's entirely possible to eat until you're full three or four times a day and not put on weight. It depends on what you eat. Some foods are so calorically dense that you don't feel sated after eating them, i.e. processed foods, so you feel the need to eat more, whereas others are not as dense and fill you up, i.e. whole foods. For example, refined carbs have so much removed, such as fibre and water, then have fat, sugar and salt added, leaving them really calorically dense and actually addictive, but if you eat unrefined, whole food carbs, you're getting less calories but leaving you feeling sated, as well as providing you with dietary fibre, which, I may add, over 90% of US citizens aren't getting enough of. For all its complexity, the stomach is not equipped for the modern, processed foods diet. It doesn't understand the difference between a belly full of chocolate and a belly full of fruit in terms of their caloric density, only their bulk.

    I eat to full several times a day, plus snacks, but over 90% of what I eat is fresh produce prepared at home. I eat some snacks, usually once a day, but even then I box clever, for example, I've just had a feed of guacamole (home made) and saltine crackers. I had manju for my mid-afternoon snack. However, I eat unrefined carbs in every meal, and lots of them, and I'm the same weight I was when I was in my late-teens/early 20s.

    The problem with portion control diets is their unsustainability. Once you hit your desired weight, what next? You're in a pickle. You can't go back to eating the portions you used to. You can't eat less than that because you'll be hungry too often, putting you at risk of returning to the old habits. Therefore, a change to a sustainable diet is necessary, one that satisfies you in terms of nutrition, satiation and taste, and for that, you need to learn to cook.

    Here's one of the best articles on processed foods I've ever read. It takes a while, but it's absolutely worth the time.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/ma...food.html?_r=0
    Paleo? WPF? It's difficult to keep up with the fads. It's fine, of course, whatever works for you. When IF came to fashion, some people did really well while others crashed on it. Diabolik observation is correct, appetite is complex. Plus, it gets mixed up with many other issues, like impulse control. Thus the reason why understanding the fundamentals is important.
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diabolik View Post
    All is possible if the goal is strong enough...you can choose how you want to be!!


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    Yep but the first one lost his hairbreadth and the second one have now to maintain his pants to keep it not falling down.

    Sorry, just passing

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by the44secs View Post
    Paleo? WPF? It's difficult to keep up with the fads. It's fine, of course, whatever works for you. When IF came to fashion, some people did really well while others crashed on it. Diabolik observation is correct, appetite is complex. Plus, it gets mixed up with many other issues, like impulse control. Thus the reason why understanding the fundamentals is important.
    What I've described is not a fad. It's how I was raised in Ireland. All I've done is removed the animals products, and I'm not suggesting you need to do that to lose weight and sustain a weight balanced diet. Amongst my peers in the 1970s there were hardly any overweight kids because we all ate home cooked meals consisting primarily of fresh ingredients with minimal processed foods. School meals were the same, cooked on site using fresh food. Of course we ate sweets and snacks, but they were sweets and snacks, not main courses like people eat today. Processed sauces these days (for example pasta and curry) contain ridiculous amounts of sugar and are more like desserts. It's the same with many 'healthy' foods like various breads, yogurt and cereals. Many people these days eat this stuff and think they have a healthy diet, then they put on weight and think it's down to gluttony, which it's not. What I'm describing is not a diet designed for weight loss, but one designed for not gaining weight in the first place. In simple terms, eat kind of like your granny did, only get adventurous.


    Yamaha Vino 50cc (Sold), Honda Transalp 400V (Sold), Honda CB400 Super Bol D'or (Sold), Yamaha Serow XT225WE (Sold), 2005 Beta Rev 3 (Current) 2015 Yamaha Serow XT250 (Current)

  8. #48

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    Weight loss is such a funny subject, a lot of people are worse at thinking - talking about it than politics even.
    Roughly 18 months ago I started a plan that lead me to losing roughly 40lb over about 8 months, most of which I still kept off (all bar 3 or 4lb). As good as it is that's not the point of the story though...
    Several people men mostly in the office asked how I did it, I been quite singular in how I went about this as I wanted to know for myself what exactly was causing the weight loss so I modified nothing in my exercise or eating other than following the plan.
    Typically when I explained what I'd done people either didn't believe me outright or made up some other reason as to why it was happening I'd say that was about 2/3 of people. That after they'd gone out of their way to ask me how I did it. So WTF did they bother asking?
    Some people actually did get inspired enough to do what I'd said and it actually worked for them too. But again that's not the main point, the point is people come over all irrational on the subject, its quite entertaining when the answers really are so simple from a physical if not a mental point of view.

    Anyway good luck to you all on your weight and fitness goals, no matter how you get there. That is unless you're gagging yourself with a spoon, in that case go see a doctor.

  9. #49

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    Yeah, there is something slightly insane about food that gets people easily into diet wars.

    Interestingly (to me), sports science has come up with a great deal of useful information over the last 20 years. Approaches that were mere hypothesis until recently have finally become backed by science while mountains of fluff have finally been discarded. The result is that weight management (loss, gain, maintenance) has been turned from an art to, literally, a science. Nowadays we have far more than the means to play with a measure on the scale. We can also determine and dictate where the loss/gain comes from (adipose tissue, muscle, bone, etc). And that's only the beginning. We can now use diet to efficiently support a multitude of performance scenarios (an incredibly useful asset on its own) as well as pursue the rather elusive goal of body recomposition (a dream come true, really).
    CRF250

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