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Thread: Scooter fork oil change

  1. #1
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    Default Scooter fork oil change

    Do I need a maintenance manual to do a scooter fork oil change? Or is it a generic process similar to all bikes? Eg. Undo bolts, pour out oil, change seals, tighten bolts.

  2. #2
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    Default Scooter fork oil change

    Look for a manual online.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    RedSquare
    Some pithy saying about biking, or a quote from a self-styled guru. Take your pick.

  3. #3
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    A lot depends on the forks. You don't say what model scooter so it's really impossible for us to give you any worth while advice other than what Red has stated.

    If you don't know what your bike is take good photos and post them. Photos that would give us an idea of the bike, and what the forks. But in general photos with these sort of questions make it much easier to help.

  4. #4
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    The scooter is a Suzuki 50cc ZZ. I've looked online in English and Japanese for manuals, but have never found anything but dodgy sites. I'll check a little more for blog's about an oil change, there are some of those.
    This is not my bike, but the forks are like this.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #5
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    So the forks you have are not like the ones on this ZZ?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
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    Default

    Those look like aftermarket shocks. Is there a model number or serial number or something? Include the manufacture name as well.

  7. #7
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    Mr Tora's photo is better. Sorry.
    Mine are gold anodized like the blue scooter. To me the shocks look similar to my photo, but maybe they are not.

    Some disassembled ones.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #8
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    Posting pictures of stuff that is not actually on your actual scooter isn't helpful. Are the shocks on your scooter Showa (as you posted above)? Honda OEM (as posted by ToraTora)? Super Sus (like in your first pic)?

    Checking your actual shocks for part numbers and/or model/maker of the actual shocks on your actual scooter would be useful. If you have after market shocks on the scooter, you can check the manufacture for servicing instructions, including oil amounts. If they're Honda OEM shocks, they may have no name on them but they may possibly have a part number. It's likely that the Honda OEM shocks are made by Showa even if they're not labeled as such, and having the model number would allow you to look up the specs from Showa.

  9. #9
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    Just to be clear--those are forks, not shocks. Shocks tend to look like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Sure one might say I'm being overly technical, or picky, but when dealing with technical repairs and such it's better to use the correct words to avoid confusion, and ultimately costly mistakes.

    I'm pretty sure that photo I posted was of a stock bike. Showa forks are standard equipment on a lot of bikes. Several of my bikes came with Showas--although different than what comes on the Suzuki ZZ scooter.

    Webike seems to have a page for the ZZ

    http://www.japan-webike.it/SUZUKI/ZZ/514/mtop/

    But I don't see seals listed. If you search for seals they show these:

    http://www.japan-webike.it/products/22782050.html

    I would open up the forks and check to see what seals are actually in there. One challenge you are going to have is finding the weight and amount of fork oil to use. You might be able to go to a local Suzuki dealer and get that information. The service guys might help you if you go to the back and chat them up.

    It would help quite a bit if you provided A LOT more information about your bike. For instance the year of the bike would be nice. ;) You are asking specific questions without giving us the specific information we would need to help you. It makes it very difficult. If it was a bike for which we had experience it would be a lot easier.

  10. #10
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    Sorry. I didn't realise there could be so many fork types.
    Mine are Gold anodized Showa forks like my second picture. These were standard on the ZZ AZ50R models.

    Here's a parts manual page.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Maybe I'll try the Showa site to see if there's info there.

    The forks don't leak, but haven't had an oil change for at least 5 years. So I guess I should change the oil. Will I need to / Should I do the seals too? Any other tips?

  11. #11
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    Nice find with the parts manual. Too bad it doesn't list the size of the seals. Many parts manuals will actually list things like seal sizes, bolt sizes, etc.

    Because those are not inverted forks you could probably drain the oil out of the forks and measure it. That would likely give you a pretty good idea of how much oil was in there. The weight of which is probably around 10 for those forks. Although it could be pretty much anything between 5 and 20.

    When you do service these make sure to get the dust seal too. That's the one on the top/outside. It's a good idea to do both the dust seal and the oil seal when servicing the forks. In this photos the seal on the left is the oil seal, and the one on the right is the dust seal.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The seals themselves should have the numbers on them. They will be something like 27x38x10. What that would mean is 27mm inside diameter, 38mm outside diameter, and a 10mm depth. Please note this is just a made up example to illustrate how seals are sized.

  12. #12
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    I pulled the forks off and started to pull them apart. Mostly done, but the oil seals are going to be a shag. They're not the typical motorbike type will pull out with the tube. I need a separate puller.
    You can see they're a little corroded, but not much. All looks good.

    I'm wondering what oil puller is good?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  13. #13
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    Those are totally standard. Just like the seal on the left in the image of seals I posted. ;) The brass part that you see below the seal is a bushing. Unless it's worn you can probably get by without having to replace it.

    Just get something like this Lisel seal puller. Be sure to put something over the edge of the fork tube so as not to damage it when using the puller. ;)

    Click image for larger version. 

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  14. #14
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    I got the seals out with a homemade puller.

    Now I've just got to clean it all up and put it back together.
    I guess:
    1 put oil seal in
    2 put inner tube in with springs etc. and do lower bolt
    3 put in oil.
    4 put final seals in.
    5 put on bike

    Is it right that there is no oil between the inner tube and the outer tube? You pour the oil into the inner tube.
    What lubricates the oil seal?
    Click image for larger version. 

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  15. #15
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    I see there's a small hole near the bottom of the inner tube which lets oil flow to the outside tube. It didn't look like a hole at first.

    Now waiting for the threadlock to harden, and will fill with oil tomorrow.

  16. #16
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    When you fit it all together you lube up the seals with fork oil. The seals don't need anything other than that.

    What bolt did you thread lock? If you thread lock number 20 which looks like it bolts into number 12. It is highly unlikely that you'd ever be able to disassemble it again.

    What do you mean by final seal? Do you mean the cap (number 15)? The only seals in the system are #11 & 9, and an oil ring that goes on the cap.

  17. #17
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    All finished. Seems to be good. No leaks after a few days running.

    I threadlocked bolt 20. All the explanations I looked at said threadlock that bolt. I think it was threadlocked when I took it out. If you loosen that bolt before you remove the springs, there's enough pressure on it to undo it.

    Other seals were the cap.

    Hardest thing was getting the forks on and off the scooter, and getting the oil seals out.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  18. #18
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    Nice work! Glad it all worked out. That's a really cool moto stand too. ;)

  19. #19
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    the overhaul was worthwhile. The forks weren't leaking but did feel sticky and probably hadn't had any service for 10 years. After the overhaul the ride is smoother and there's no feeling of stickiness in the fork movement.

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