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Thread: So I made a call to find out about testing for my license

  1. #21
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    I hope you feel better soon.

    Have you looked at those course maps yet? Can you understand them? There's no sense in going to take the test until you can.

    Let's be real here for a minute: People talk about going straight to the testing center and just failing the test over and over again until they pass and it still works out to being way cheaper than paying a driving school. It has taken you about five months to scrape together enough money to go take the test once. How long will it take you to save that much money again? Five more months? You need to maximize your chances of passing by doing as much preparation as you can before you go. If you can't make sense out of maps you've had five months to look at then you don't have a snowball's chance in hell of passing the test. You sure as hell aren't going to suddenly understand the map at the test center on the day of the test when you're nervous and only have a few minutes to look at it and have never ridden a driving school course before.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cash View Post
    I hope you feel better soon.

    Have you looked at those course maps yet? Can you understand them? There's no sense in going to take the test until you can.

    Let's be real here for a minute: People talk about going straight to the testing center and just failing the test over and over again until they pass and it still works out to being way cheaper than paying a driving school. It has taken you about five months to scrape together enough money to go take the test once. How long will it take you to save that much money again? Five more months? You need to maximize your chances of passing by doing as much preparation as you can before you go. If you can't make sense out of maps you've had five months to look at then you don't have a snowball's chance in hell of passing the test. You sure as hell aren't going to suddenly understand the map at the test center on the day of the test when you're nervous and only have a few minutes to look at it and have never ridden a driving school course before.
    Thanks Mike
    Many of the members here know that you are one of the kindest persons on the forum, although you can be a pretty tough on your treads , you call it as it is. Also you know a little about me, but my respect for you is that of the highest regards and I mean that.
    I didn't know that I have to memorize the course , I thought they would run us through it on the test, thanks for telling me that.

    My health test which I've been worried about and somewhat costly about my lungs and cancer, the other day came negative, so now I'm going to give it the lust of my life to get them chugata license , I mean it Mike, you know me, I don't give up.

  3. #23
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    Thanks for your kind words and understanding.

    Yes, the whole reason I've been harping on the course maps is that you have to run exactly the course they tell you to.

    Glad to hear your health tests went well.

  4. #24
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    I don't have an answer for this, but here is google map view. Is the course just one of these or could it be all of them. Actually I think I might have just answered my question. So there is only one course, but "3" ways of doing the course? Is that right.

    https://www.google.co.jp/maps/place/...1.398207?hl=en

    I posted the pictures of the course maps and I actually thought it was 3 different courses, but not really, just 3 ways of doing the course. Is that correct?

    Mike, thanks about the concern about my health. My cough now seems to be about 98% gone, but its always been a lingering cough throughout the years.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by adventurous biker View Post
    I posted the pictures of the course maps and I actually thought it was 3 different courses, but not really, just 3 ways of doing the course. Is that correct?
    That is correct. You are expected to know all the possible courses, the examiner will tell you which one you are to drive. Possibly as late as when you are sitting on the test bike with the motor running.

    Have you gone to the testing center to watch others? The process is *VERY* picky with an absurdly high fail rate. Falling off the bridge and not stopping before the line (or not going fast enough) are the most common. The time I passed, the examiner had to look through 3 different drawers for the "Pass" paperwork. "Fail" was a pad on the counter.

    This:

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/IfumLoyh4oc

    is the course in Tokyo. Not the same arrangement but all the components are present.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtfm View Post
    That is correct. You are expected to know all the possible courses, the examiner will tell you which one you are to drive. Possibly as late as when you are sitting on the test bike with the motor running.

    Have you gone to the testing center to watch others? The process is *VERY* picky with an absurdly high fail rate. Falling off the bridge and not stopping before the line (or not going fast enough) are the most common. The time I passed, the examiner had to look through 3 different drawers for the "Pass" paperwork. "Fail" was a pad on the counter.

    This:

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/IfumLoyh4oc

    is the course in Tokyo. Not the same arrangement but all the components are present.
    Thanks RF
    Weather permitting next week when I go in person to make reservations ( I hope, seems like something always pops up) I'll look at the course with the thought of actually doing it. Question: I used to own a 400 cc Suzuzki and a 350 cc Honda, but that was back in the late 70's, I kind of worried that the 400cc might be too big for me now to test on, but I do want a 250 cc. Hope I don't fall off it. Is the clutch one down and four up on these motorcycles?

  7. #27
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    I just made a new thread listing all the things you can get points deducted for on the licensing test, so you may want to take a close look at that.

    You may notice lots of weird little roads on the course maps. You are required to go through things like a narrow road section, an S-curve, section, a crank section, etc. Failure to go through one of them will be seen as failure to be ABLE to go through them and will result in an automatic FAIL even if you get everything else just perfect. You really do have to be able to remember the specified course (#1, #2, #3) and run it just as it appears on the map.

    Bikes for the chugata license have to be over 300cc, which means that you will be tested on a 400cc bike.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by adventurous biker View Post
    I kind of worried that the 400cc might be too big for me now to test on, but I do want a 250 cc. Hope I don't fall off it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cash View Post
    Bikes for the chugata license have to be over 300cc, which means that you will be tested on a 400cc bike.
    Note exactly what Mike said - you will be tested on a 400cc. They supply the bike, you don't get to pick. It will be a large, well-used, well-abused model with roll bars, a bad clutch, poorly adjusted brakes etc. etc. If it's too big for you, too bad. You do get to make one lap of the course before the test actually starts but there's no way you will learn anything other than what shape the thing is in. "One lap" means one circuit of the outer track, not one run of the course's various twists and turns.

    Falling off the bike is an automatic fail, and a sign that you need a lot more practice before trying again. Falling off the bridge is very easy, and also an automatic fail.

    Quote Originally Posted by adventurous biker View Post
    Is the clutch one down and four up on these motorcycles?
    That's a joke, right? If not, it's time to think about an automatic transmission model.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtfm View Post
    That is correct. You are expected to know all the possible courses, the examiner will tell you which one you are to drive. Possibly as late as when you are sitting on the test bike with the motor running.

    Have you gone to the testing center to watch others? The process is *VERY* picky with an absurdly high fail rate. Falling off the bridge and not stopping before the line (or not going fast enough) are the most common. The time I passed, the examiner had to look through 3 different drawers for the "Pass" paperwork. "Fail" was a pad on the counter.

    This:

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/IfumLoyh4oc

    is the course in Tokyo. Not the same arrangement but all the components are present.
    Is that you on the bike?
    No, the test is in Yamaguchi ken, Ogori city.

    I mentioned on my last thread about the clutch. Hmm..

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtfm View Post
    Note exactly what Mike said - you will be tested on a 400cc. They supply the bike, you don't get to pick. It will be a large, well-used, well-abused model with roll bars, a bad clutch, poorly adjusted brakes etc. etc. If it's too big for you, too bad. You do get to make one lap of the course before the test actually starts but there's no way you will learn anything other than what shape the thing is in. "One lap" means one circuit of the outer track, not one run of the course's various twists and turns.

    Falling off the bike is an automatic fail, and a sign that you need a lot more practice before trying again. Falling off the bridge is very easy, and also an automatic fail.



    That's a joke, right? If not, it's time to think about an automatic transmission model.

    No, it wasn't a joke. So the clutch is all down and when you change to slow, it it all up. I'll have to ask the guy that I bought my scooter from about this, I feel bad, I haven't been on a motorcycle since 1978, can't believe I forgot and I had 3 of them. Anyway, I wasn't joking.

  11. #31
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    If the test will be the first time you've operated a motorcycle clutch and gear shift in 40 years, it's a pretty sure bet you're going to fail.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cash View Post
    If the test will be the first time you've operated a motorcycle clutch and gear shift in 40 years, it's a pretty sure bet you're going to fail.
    Well, I'm going to go for it anyway and just be careful as all heck. The guy I bought my scooter from he has some motorcycles for but the are 900cc and up and I don't think he'll let me practice on them. Too big , but at least he can show me about the clutch and gear stuff.

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by adventurous biker View Post
    Well, I'm going to go for it anyway and just be careful as all heck.
    You fail for that too. "riding too slowly" falls under the section time or impeding traffic line, or the examiner just thinks you're not ready.

    I was told once (after completing the whole course) "go faster". Next time took a curve fast enough to drag the kickstand to much noise and apparently a good spray of sparks. This is apparently fine cause that's the one I passed.

    In case it hasn't been mentioned before, try this route:

    1. 125cc scooter test (automatic transmission model). Very easy to pass.

    2. Buy a 125cc scooter, use it for a year.

    3. Go back for the 400cc test later. Upgrade tests cost half as much as the initial bike endorsement. Same test, just cheaper.

    Based on what you describe above, you have zero chance of passing the official test. The examiners will quickly notice a pattern and be even pickier than usual. They are not overly interested in people learning to drive on the test track, and you won't learn a thing with 2 minutes every other week.

    Also in case you don't know, "fail" means the test ends at that point. You don't get to run the whole course each time. It's quite possible to fail at the start line, and that's Y5000 + half a day gone right there.

  14. #34
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    You're a grown man, blow your pocket money any way you see fit as far as I'm concerned. But I don't think you fully realize just how amazingly uptight Japan is about licensing people. It isn't like in the U.S. where they give out licenses like they're passing out Halloween candy.

    People who have been actively riding in their home countries and ride just fine come here and find that it takes them a half-dozen or more tries to pass the test here. That's people who are used to riding, who can handle the clutch/gears and everything else unconsciously, but fail because they haven't learned all the little nitpicky stuff that gets points deducted.

    You won't be able to concentrate on the little nitpicky stuff because you'll be too busy being nervous about the test and scared shitless of a vehicle you haven't operated since six presidents ago. You're going to kill the engine at least once. You're going to wobble like hell. You're going to be awkward with the brakes (or lock them and crash or drop the bike). You're going to fail just on petty shit like that (and deservedly so). It will be painfully obvious to anybody that you haven't been on a motorcycle in forty years and that you have no business being allowed on the public roadways on one.

    It isn't the job of your neighborhood bike shop guy to show you how a clutch and gear shift works. If you have to ask before you can go take the test then you have no damned business taking the test.

    It isn't the job of the testing center to serve as your practice course and they will get pissed off and tell you that isn't their function when it becomes obvious you have no idea how to ride and have done no preparation or practice anywhere.

    You're being naive about this whole thing pretty much to the point of appearing delusional. But go ahead and try it, even if it is just once, just so you can have the experience of it and get it out of your system. You won't understand how impractical this is or how uptight they are until you go experience it for yourself.
    Last edited by Mike Cash; 05-01-18 at 09:31 AM.

  15. #35

    Default So I made a call to find out about testing for my license

    Ditto what Mike said. Why not just fly to some cheap holiday spot and rent a small bike and learn there? With cheap flight and travel insurance, will still work out cheaper.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cash View Post
    You're a grown man, blow your pocket money any way you see fit as far as I'm concerned. But I don't think you fully realize just how amazingly uptight Japan is about licensing people. It isn't like in the U.S. where they give out licenses like they're passing out Halloween candy.

    People who have been actively riding in their home countries and ride just fine come here and find that it takes them a half-dozen or more tries to pass the test here. That's people who are used to riding, who can handle the clutch/gears and everything else unconsciously, but fail because they haven't learned all the little nitpicky stuff that gets points deducted.

    You won't be able to concentrate on the little nitpicky stuff because you'll be too busy being nervous about the test and scared shitless of a vehicle you haven't operated since six presidents ago. You're going to kill the engine at least once. You're going to wobble like hell. You're going to be awkward with the brakes (or lock them and crash or drop the bike). You're going to fail just on petty shit like that (and deservedly so). It will be painfully obvious to anybody that you haven't been on a motorcycle in forty years and that you have no business being allowed on the public roadways on one.

    It isn't the job of your neighborhood bike shop guy to show you how a clutch and gear shift works. If you have to ask before you can go take the test then you have no damned business taking the test.

    It isn't the job of the testing center to serve as your practice course and they will get pissed off and tell you that isn't their function when it becomes obvious you have no idea how to ride and have done no preparation or practice anywhere.

    You're being naive about this whole thing pretty much to the point of appearing delusional. But go ahead and try it, even if it is just once, just so you can have the experience of it and get it out of your system. You won't understand how impractical this is or how uptight they are until you go experience it for yourself.
    Thanks Mike
    I may have put my hopes too high on this. Although I've owned 3 bikes in the past, I honestly forgot how the clutch worked. Dang. Anyway, its one down then up for neutral and then up for 2nd and up for 3rd and up for 4 th and up for 5th. The shop owner said something to me today which is in line with what you said. I think he said something "wholly fk".. and laugh his butt off. He then gave me the keys to my scooter and smiled.

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