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Thread: Australian just accepted ALT job in japan

  1. #1

    Default Australian just accepted ALT job in japan

    Australian 26yr old moving to japan in a month or 2,
    afew quick questions
    1. are bike surfboard racks legal?
    2. do Australians need to do the tests for licence like the Americans (i have IDP already might be here more than a year)
    3. is it frowned upon if i commute to work on a bike as a teacher?
    4. are there places like our state forests in japan (state forests are places u can ride a dirt bike freely through large areas of bush as long as its registered)
    5. i'd like to do afew enduro races, i have an Aus race licence, u reckon they'll accept it at a local event? or will they want FIM or something?
    6. 300cc 2strokers street legal?, australia has really lax emissions laws so we get all the fun; can this continue in japan?
    7. does anyone ride a beta and willing to part? (rr300 or 390 will settle for 250)?
    8. if not please sell me a wr250f, ktm 250exc-f, husaberg, husky te250, sherco? klx250 will do in a pinch.
    9. where sells tyres/barkbusters/ replacement shit for when i innevitably break stuff on the trails.

    10. make it a round number, who rides dirt and when can you show me some trails? - will repay in beers.

  2. #2

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    1. Not sure
    2. No, it converts straight over. Budget a whole day at the licensing center.
    3. Probably, depends on your boss and company. Don't ask don't tell.

    The rest of your questions probably depend a lot on location. Where will you be?

    I'm a rank beginner when it comes to off-road, but I've been thinking of getting a 250 trail bike myself.

  3. #3

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    1. Yes. See plenty of them near the beaches.
    2. Easy conversion, but not for a year. Your IDP is good for the first year after arrival, the license centers usually say come back around the 1-year mark.
    3. Depends where you work. In the smaller towns, no problem. Central Tokyo, good luck finding parking. I used to ride to work locations all the time. Do NOT ask in advance as the official answer is invariably No!

    6. 300cc is a very odd size for complicated reasons. Most everything over a (rather old) 50cc will be 4-stroke. Highly unlikely you will find a new-manufacture 2-stroke anywhere.

    9. Search terms are NAPS, 2りんかん, Ricoland. Shops across the country. Hundreds of dealers and independents of various size and quality.

    "Where" is rather important - Japan is much larger than most people realize. If you are going to Sapporo you won't need the surfboard rack - have not yet met an Australian capable of handling temperatures below the mid-20s. And the "bush" in other places is so dense the only motor you will be using will be on the chainsaw.

  4. #4

    Default Australian just accepted ALT job in japan

    4, 10: try in some of the forums, they list some. For example,
    http://www.gaijinriders.com/showthre...ea-In-Kanagawa

  5. #5

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    Cheers all for the responses, keen to get a bike and get out on the trails.

    I contacted the beta distributor and after much confusions and google translate he said the 250's are road legal cause no shaken but 300cc isn't cause emissions, competition use only.

  6. #6
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    What's the deal in Japan if you have a 250 and you put a 300 top end on it?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToraTora View Post
    What's the deal in Japan if you have a 250 and you put a 300 top end on it?
    You have to re-register it at its true displacement. It will subsequently be subject to shaken.

    I think the OP is going to be extremely disappointed in the availability of opportunities to ride off-road in Japan; the Japanese riders who share his interest certainly are.

    http://everyday366.hatenablog.com/en...7/10/20/145309
    Last edited by Mike Cash; 11-02-18 at 09:16 PM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToraTora View Post
    What's the deal in Japan if you have a 250 and you put a 300 top end on it?
    You could do this but then your power valve will be all out of whack and the pipe won't be tuned properly- also the 250 better has almost identical power to the 300. the 300 has different power delivery with it being lower down and torquier.

    U reckon if i follow a road into the mountains and just sort of keep going once it ends people will flip out?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghosting View Post
    U reckon if i follow a road into the mountains and just sort of keep going once it ends people will flip out?
    Depending on things like whether there are fences or signs, you could be in violation of the Minor Offenses Law and be looking at up to a month in the pokey and/or up to 10,000 yen fine. Or.... depending on if you tear shit up you could be looking at up to three years in prison and/or up to 300,000 yen in fines for vandalism. (Plus subsequent deportation and a lifetime ban on ever entering the country again).

    Just like flat land, mountains are private property as a general thing.

    If you're not being obstreperous, there's probably nothing to worry about. If you're up there blasting a two-stroke and sound like you're sawing somebody's trees down, you may get some attention you'd rather not have.

    You've never seen what the territory around where the trail peters out in Japanese mountains looks like, have you?

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    That's pretty damn harsh!

    What about cats like these? Do the Rindo guys get a pass because they are still technically riding roads?


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    I think that maybe foreigners use "rindo" in a much looser sense than it is used in Japanese, which would make that question seem quite natural. While it does directly translate as "forest road" and English speakers in Japan seem to use it for any unpaved path, in Japanese it is the name of a category of public road.

    Just as in the states you have:

    National highway
    State highway
    County road
    City street

    which all denote which level of government is responsible for the funding/upkeep on a road, there are categories of road in Japan which denote who is responsible for them and various standards such as level of upkeep.

    "Rindo" is at the bottom of the heap when it comes to the standards for the level of upkeep, and they range from beautifully paved very nice roads down to unpaved, washed out, heavily rutted, cowpaths strewn with years of fallen leaf debris and fallen rocks.

    Because "rindo" are public roads, you will know you're on one because there are signs marking them as "rindo".

    There are also usually signs marking private roads as private property. These are not "rindo", even though they are roads through the forest. Are also usually marked against trespassing. It helps to learn to read the language just a little bit.

  12. #12

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    Ghosting, I guess it depends on the location. Once I followed google maps to what looked like a nice twisty mountain road. When I got a short way up, found a locked gate with a sign explaining the road was closed to the public. Given the number of large rocks and debris, and the fact that I was on a road bike, I wouldn't have ridden it anyway, but within five minutes a couple of guys in a k-truck rolled up and parked conspicuously nearby. They didn't say anything, but my guess is that they were staff from the nearby ranger post (hiking area), saw me turn up the road, and stopped by to discourage me from trying to get around the gate.

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    I often ride official rindo on my S1000RR or Vrod. As noted, they can be in varying levels of conditions, but usually manageable at reasonable speeds. Occasionally I worry about my suspension, but is also a different kind of fun. I probably need a proper ADV bike next time (or in addition...)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghosting View Post
    Australian 26yr old moving to japan in a month or 2,
    afew quick questions
    1. are bike surfboard racks legal?
    2. do Australians need to do the tests for licence like the Americans (i have IDP already might be here more than a year)
    3. is it frowned upon if i commute to work on a bike as a teacher?
    4. are there places like our state forests in japan (state forests are places u can ride a dirt bike freely through large areas of bush as long as its registered)
    5. i'd like to do afew enduro races, i have an Aus race licence, u reckon they'll accept it at a local event? or will they want FIM or something?
    6. 300cc 2strokers street legal?, australia has really lax emissions laws so we get all the fun; can this continue in japan?
    7. does anyone ride a beta and willing to part? (rr300 or 390 will settle for 250)?
    8. if not please sell me a wr250f, ktm 250exc-f, husaberg, husky te250, sherco? klx250 will do in a pinch.
    9. where sells tyres/barkbusters/ replacement shit for when i innevitably break stuff on the trails.

    10. make it a round number, who rides dirt and when can you show me some trails? - will repay in beers.
    What city / area are you in?
    As for riding to work, like others have said, don't say anything.

    What company are you with? Many Language employers will tell you a whole lot of 'rules' which you can just ignore.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-rider View Post
    I often ride official rindo on my S1000RR or Vrod. As noted, they can be in varying levels of conditions, but usually manageable at reasonable speeds. Occasionally I worry about my suspension, but is also a different kind of fun. I probably need a proper ADV bike next time (or in addition...)
    I wonder if that's what we call goaty out here in the Bay Area.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghosting View Post
    3. is it frowned upon if i commute to work on a bike as a teacher?
    My suggestion here is don't ask, because if you do ask, the answer will almost certainly be no. Once they tell you no, you'll be required to follow that rule. Workers' compensation insurance covers your commute to work, so by law if the company tells you you can't commute by bike, you will be required by law to abide by that rule.

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