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Thread: Starter Bike

  1. #1

    Default Starter Bike

    Dear Wise and learned members

    Or bunch of sourpusses

    Here is my quandary. I want a small bike with manual gears to practice on before I get my 125 manual license.

    I commute 10km to Tokyo Station most mornings (I don’t bother in the rain). Currently I use my Cub, just 50cc but almost perfect. It would be better if it was the 110 but I only have a car license.
    I would like the choice to choose another scooter of 125 size, or a small bike of any size, probably a nice classic naked or retro style bike.

    I guess I could go straight to test through a school, and probably pass after a few weeks and a lot of money, or I could go to the license Centre where they will most likely fail me.
    so for those who say, ignore a 50 just test and go straight to 125, I hear you but unless I can find one of those one day intensives for reasonable money, I think I will practice on a 50 for a few months.

    I want it comfortable, manual, reliable. Thinking a Yamaha YB1 Four, or something similar.

    any ideas? I could do with something not too small like an Ape as it would be nice to drive without my knees not being by my ears.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2

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    I quite like this, but expensive at 300,000

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Cool Get a Stroker!!

    For small bike- nothing beats the two stroke. There are lots of options.

    On GooBike listings there is this right now, and yes that's a 50cc! There are tons of aftermarket parts available. You can even bring it up to ~100cc. It's one of those bikes that you can start out slow, and work your way up by installing upgrades. They are very easy to work on too, because they don't have any of the crazy valve train stuff that a four stroke must endure. If you don't like the body style they do make other versions.

    http://www.goobike.com/spread/850312...001/index.html

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    Last edited by ToraTora; 28-02-18 at 08:15 PM. Reason: spelling!

  4. #4
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    Default

    In the domestic brands there are also lots of options. Say like one of these.

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  5. #5
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    Cool

    Here's another one. I have one of these in an 05. I've had a lot of bikes including wacky things like a Paso, an RSV, and currently an 899, and yet my 05 GPR is by far my favorite out of all of them. It's just so much fun to ride. This bike on Goo is a special edition Belson Replica. I'd have to look it up because it's late enough that I can't remember, but this could be Espargaro's replica—yup it is!

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  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks Tora Tora, I think I would probably go for a Dream 50 if I was spending that much money, http://motorcycle.goobike.com/motorc...5B30180220001/

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    But realistically I think a bike up to 150,000 might be more my budget.

    Thanks for the tip on 2 stroke, I hasn’t considered them to be honest, but I guess I will get a bit more punch for my yen with one.

    What about the sporty riding position? Isn’t it a bit more uncomfortable especially if I ha e a bag with me or want to pop down the shops?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Kyoto
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    Default Starter Bike

    On the sport position. Everyone is different. Personally that is all I ride and I ride daily. And then my good buddy rides a cruiser style bike every day to work. SO it is all what you are comfortable riding and how far you will ride daily. Just my personal experience here.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  8. #8

    Default

    That RZ50 is starting to grow on me....

  9. #9

    Default

    This seems suspiciously good value, has anyone read a Japanese review? Can’t find one in English, saw one in Chinese, and it appears favourable.
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    http://www.goobike.com/web/search/sp...ai_name=iphone

  10. #10
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    Default

    That's an interesting bike that has been marketed under a number of different names. It's mostly a Derbi Mulhacén Café 125cc—one that was basically put together from the parts bin. The wheels have been on Derbis since 2005 (although they are now made in China instead of Italy). The swing arm is straight from the 2000ish Sendas. As is the rear brake pedal, and probably the triples. The engine is also made in China, and first showed up on the GPR 125 4T, and the Aprilia 125 RS4 in I think 2009, but could be 2010. The bike is from Derbi's scrambler series named after the highest mountain in Spain—Mulhacén.

    Malossi makes an upgrade kit for this engine that brings it up to about 160cc. Same bottom end, just a larger cylinder. So there is an upgrade path.

    I didn't mention this bike because I thought I read that you wanted to stay under 110cc. Still if you are open to a 125 4T this would be a fun, and affordable way to go. The engine has proven reliable, and has been around for nearly a decade. Which means there will be plenty of parts available for it for years. Since it is shared in probably ten different bikes by now is also a good sign. Piaggio is the parent company of Derbi and Aprilia. The two brands are very closely related now. From what I've been able to gleam so far it looks like the engine is based on Derbi's 2T bottom end, and then modified to become a four stroke.

    If you can find the Derbi version it will have better forks, and probably a better front brake too. Yup here you go:

    http://www.goobike.com/spread/850022...010/index.html


    Derbi also makes a 659cc version of the bike with a Yamaha XT engine. If I could have figured out a way to bring it home I might have shopped hard for one of these for this summer. ;)

    http://www.motorcycle.com/manufactur...ort-30004.html

  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by racer162 View Post
    On the sport position. Everyone is different. Personally that is all I ride and I ride daily. And then my good buddy rides a cruiser style bike every day to work. SO it is all what you are comfortable riding and how far you will ride daily. Just my personal experience here.
    I have found for me the "sport" position to be the most comfortable. You do have to learn to not carry your weight on your arms, but that's not too hard to learn. I like this position because it's more natural for the back. It allows it to be a spring instead of a board. More like a cat.

    Merson, I'm rather fond of the smaller bikes (but not limited to them, it's a choice thing). I'll be going to Japan this spring to play tabibito san. You can see the bike I bought for this adventure in my tabi thread. One of the nice things about the Derbi, and the Aprilias we've been talking about is that they are full sized bikes. I'm 6ft and I fit very comfortably on these bikes. :)

    As for the Honda, well I'm not so fond of Honda anymore, because I believe (based on a lot of research), that they have caused irreparable harm to the moto industry. That's not to say that I wont interact with, or even help folks with them (as Racer can vouch for), but I can't in good faith recommend a bike from a company that does the things they do. :( But there are so many great bikes out there that I really haven't found this to be an issue. There always seems to be a better alternative to anything they have to offer. :P

  12. #12
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  13. Default

    Tora Tora, you are a fucking legend!

    Thanks so much for taking the time to write such helpful advice. Regarding the driving position, that makes a lot of sense, I have a bad back so concentrating on my posture and balance to keep my back straight and not supporting my weight on my arms would be great to get in to the habit of.
    There seems to be one of those Derbi equivalents for 250k on goobike, I will see if I can get one of those in the first instance.

    Regarding my flip flop to 125 after all, a colleague at work suggests that there are some one day intensive schools in Tokyo that you can obtain your certificate in 1 day. If I find one and it is reasonable enough, that’s what I will probably do.

    A couple of other questions if you could entertain me��.
    Is it best to learn on the best machine possible, weight, brakes, handling etc, as it is a risky business
    and you want the best possible equipment? Or is it better to go a bit more old school and learn about the challenges and difficulties of bike riding, then build your way up to more advanced bikes?

    Lastly, is there a more retro styled bike that has all these advanced features of the Derbi, but in a more nostalgic look?

    I am 46 and have a great beard, so want the collars and cuffs to match if you know what I mean : -)

  14. #14
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    Default Starter Bike

    Your question on equipment if we are talking about the bike. Imho it's best to learn on a lesser bike build your chops and move up as your experience and wallet allow.
    That being said there are bikes with retro styling that have some of the newer bells and whistles.
    If we're talking about riding gear the old adage is $10 helmet $10 head😎 do not skimp on safety gear! Again just my opinion as you will hear others have their thoughts on it. I was raised that no matter the vehicle you get good protective gear not cheap shit.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  15. #15
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    Default

    I would give thought to going to driving school and getting a mid-sized license.

  16. Default

    Thanks Racer, and yes Mike that is on my mind,

    I am just conscious of ‘scope creep’ here, currently I ha e a quite sedated but very easy and practical Honda Cub commmute where I don’t need full leathers, can go to work in my suit and can just sneak through the traffic very easily, at such a low cost,
    I can see all those things changing the larger the bike. Also haven’t really approached the top in with the wife on the ‘proper motorbike’ option.

  17. #17
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    Default

    KSR 2 80cc two stroke is an option. You can get a good one for about ¥100,000.

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    Or a Yamaha SDR200. 200cc two stroke. Which is more ¥200,000?

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  18. #18
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    Default Starter Bike

    While the ksr is nice and popular little bikes to run around on. I'd choose the Yamaha of these 2 👍🏍
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  19. #19
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    Default Starter Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Mersontheperson View Post
    Thanks Racer, and yes Mike that is on my mind,

    I am just conscious of ‘scope creep’ here, currently I ha e a quite sedated but very easy and practical Honda Cub commmute where I don’t need full leathers, can go to work in my suit and can just sneak through the traffic very easily, at such a low cost,
    I can see all those things changing the larger the bike. Also haven’t really approached the top in with the wife on the ‘proper motorbike’ option.
    I don't think anyone here will ever knock the cub! Long running production bike reliable and I'm sure im not the only one, but I've met a few folks in my travels here riding long distance on them.
    On the wife, she knows you ride the cub correct?
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  20. #20
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mersontheperson View Post
    Thanks Racer, and yes Mike that is on my mind,

    I am just conscious of ‘scope creep’ here, currently I ha e a quite sedated but very easy and practical Honda Cub commmute where I don’t need full leathers, can go to work in my suit and can just sneak through the traffic very easily, at such a low cost,
    I can see all those things changing the larger the bike. Also haven’t really approached the top in with the wife on the ‘proper motorbike’ option.

    The skills will apply no matter the size of bike. And it lets you edge up to a 250 if you want, which has just about all the convenience factor of the smaller bikes, avoids shaken expenses, and is far more suited to longer trips or touring than a 125, should you ever decide you'd like to expand your horizons on some bright sunny weekend.

    I've got the large bike license....and a large bike. But truth be told I'd be just as contented if all I had to ride was a nice 250.

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