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Thread: New to me a Serow

  1. #1
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Greetings everyone!
    Iím my recently decided quest to get a full on mid size ADV bike I fell into a serow. Itís a first step yeah yeah itís a 225 so not mid size but a good start poking and local ride.below are before and after pics.
    Hereís what I know and donít 😎.
    I found a US/Canadian Spec service manual and wiring diagram but there are differences so if anyone can point me in a direction to get one foe a japan spec great.
    Best I can figure itís a 96í or 97í
    I bought rebuild kits fir front and rear master cylinders from Yamaha and a new front tire the rear was good.
    Has new battery and coil. Still no spark. So Iím thinking the CDI. Was thinking after the holiday to take it to the Yamaha shop and ask them to test it, thoughts?
    Here are a couple pics
    Before:


    After:

    Last edited by racer162; 02-01-19 at 09:48 AM.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  2. #2

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    HT lead is not connected in the updated pics.

    CDI's fail when the capacitors leak. I've pulled a bunch apart and replaced the capacitors and they worked fine.
    Can be a pain to get them apart without damaging the electronics though. Usually, i would check the crank pickup
    sensor and cam sensor, if it has one, for a signal. It would either be the CDI, the crank pickup of a wiring issue ( bad connection
    or something someone hacked in the past ).
    Apexmoto Inc - Dyno tuning, engine/chassis/suspension upgrades, repairs, shaken, tires & changing with balancing, graphics printing, stickers, media blasting, painting & powder coating.

  3. #3
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Quote Originally Posted by Jav View Post
    HT lead is not connected in the updated pics.

    CDI's fail when the capacitors leak. I've pulled a bunch apart and replaced the capacitors and they worked fine.
    Can be a pain to get them apart without damaging the electronics though. Usually, i would check the crank pickup
    sensor and cam sensor, if it has one, for a signal. It would either be the CDI, the crank pickup of a wiring issue ( bad connection
    or something someone hacked in the past ).
    Sorry ďHT leadĒ?
    I read on the web somewhere about taking app art the CDI units. Iím looking at the wiring harness no ones messed with it so thatís a good thing.
    I put a meter on and tested the usual suspects and they tested fine.
    Iíve got the means to, but Iím wondering is it worth taking the CDI apart to repair or just get another one?

    Hereís a tire question currently I have Dunlop D605ís on the bike, and they are quite knobby.
    Is there a tire people use thatís more street friendly but yes still ok in the off road a bit?
    Iíve seen the IRC tires online but no experience with them.
    Maybe the Rindo riding guys have a suggestion. And the bike has a 18Ē rear and 21Ē front.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  4. #4
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    Default

    Wow, that cleaned up nice!

  5. #5
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hawk View Post
    Wow, that cleaned up nice!
    Thanks, a lot of elbow grease, simple green and Muck Off... lol. The bike had been sitting for about 10 years. Once I get this electrical issue finished should be a fun little ride.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  6. #6

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    There is nothing connected to the spark plug in the 2nd picture, ie the HT ( high tension or voltage ) lead is removed.
    Just mentioning it.

    If i was sure the pickups were ok, i'd probably just buy a used unit.
    If the old one turned out to be failed, i would hack it open and look inside anyway. Just to learn
    about it. What chips were used and to see if i could fix it. But that is more personal interest.

    Dunlop 605's are actually a decent street tire. I've taken an RMX250 ( off road wheels/D605's ) on a track and
    was able to ride the bike faster than many street bikes/tires. The Dunlop 604 is more on road but i found they
    were pretty average off road. The 605's are a good compromise. If your mainly doing commuting then maybe a
    more street oriented tire would be better, but if you are only using the bike on weekends and 50% off road, then i
    would stick with the D605's.

    Most IRC tires are decent. We used IRC street tires on rental bikes, because they are cheap, long lasting and still
    afford decent grip.


    Quote Originally Posted by racer162 View Post
    Sorry ďHT leadĒ?
    I read on the web somewhere about taking app art the CDI units. Iím looking at the wiring harness no ones messed with it so thatís a good thing.
    I put a meter on and tested the usual suspects and they tested fine.
    Iíve got the means to, but Iím wondering is it worth taking the CDI apart to repair or just get another one?

    Hereís a tire question currently I have Dunlop D605ís on the bike, and they are quite knobby.
    Is there a tire people use thatís more street friendly but yes still ok in the off road a bit?
    Iíve seen the IRC tires online but no experience with them.
    Maybe the Rindo riding guys have a suggestion. And the bike has a 18Ē rear and 21Ē front.
    Apexmoto Inc - Dyno tuning, engine/chassis/suspension upgrades, repairs, shaken, tires & changing with balancing, graphics printing, stickers, media blasting, painting & powder coating.

  7. #7
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Great info to consider. Yeah I had removed the bad coil before that picture😎 good to know about the IRC tires.
    Guess after the electrical is sorted and Iím able to ride I can decide which way will be best for me on tires.
    If my CDI is bad for sure and I replace it Iím certainly up for opening it and checking it out for repair.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  8. #8
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    Wow! You really cleaned that one up. The Serow's have a good value to them, at least at the bike shops. I know the new Serows are 250cc and they are really hot.
    It's my choice of bike if and when it ever happens. If not, well, I'm still an adventurous biker on a scooter LOL

  9. #9
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Hereís a light(s) question. While I see I can change out the front bulb. Has anyone here on a Serow or a 250 Adv/DP bike switched all their lights, headlight, tail/brake and turn signals to LED? And is there anything I need to be aware of if I do so?
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by racer162 View Post
    Here’s a light(s) question. While I see I can change out the front bulb. Has anyone here on a Serow or a 250 Adv/DP bike switched all their lights, headlight, tail/brake and turn signals to LED? And is there anything I need to be aware of if I do so?
    Aftermarket flasher unit for the turn signals. You need to check if the stock unit is a 2 pin or a 3 pin.
    I may have new units in stock •900 plus shipping, so if you need one, let me know. Headlight and
    tail light are not an issue.
    Apexmoto Inc - Dyno tuning, engine/chassis/suspension upgrades, repairs, shaken, tires & changing with balancing, graphics printing, stickers, media blasting, painting & powder coating.

  11. #11
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Yeah I knew changing wasnít an issue, always good to get confirmation on yhat👍
    In turn signals I have them but I have to double check the relay. I think itís a 2 pin but will be checking when I go out to work on it here shortly
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  12. #12
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    Street biased tires are dangerous off-road due to less traction and thus control. You also risk getting fishbowled by going down into something you don’t have the traction to climb back out of. Inexperienced riders should not handicap themselves running street biased tires off-road.


  13. #13
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Quote Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
    Street biased tires are dangerous off-road due less control. You also risk getting fishbowled by going down into something you donít have the traction to climb back out of. Inexperienced riders should not handicap themselves running street biased tires off-road.
    Thanks great info. Looking for a tire thatís street and dirt going thereís something thatís not quite as knobby at the Dunlop D605 currently on it. 2 reasons Iím told the street will eat them up quickly and Iíll be trying to use it as my daily commuter instead of the Ducati and 2nd Iíd say my tarmac vs dirt will probably be a 70/30 split.

    Thanks again all getting valuable info here on this👍🏍👍
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by racer162 View Post
    Thanks great info. Looking for a tire that’s street and dirt going there’s something that’s not quite as knobby at the Dunlop D605 currently on it. 2 reasons I’m told the street will eat them up quickly and I’ll be trying to use it as my daily commuter instead of the Ducati and 2nd I’d say my tarmac vs dirt will probably be a 70/30 split.

    Thanks again all getting valuable info here on this������
    D605 is already a bit too street biased. I wouldn’t go any less knobbie with a bike I plan to ride off-road for the reasons mentioned above. My advice is either replace your tires often or commute on a 125cc scooter instead.


  15. #15
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Wow cool I didnít think that was the case... happy to be wrong and educated on that thanks.
    ***Update****
    So I went to the Yamaha shop to get the CDI tested. They told me that because my bike was so old they had no way to test the CDI. I found that hard to believe but then realized that in Japan vehicles have an end of life on getting new parts.
    They suggested auction sites that was the best they could suggest. So if anybody else has a suggestion Iím open.
    Last edited by racer162; 06-01-19 at 11:13 AM.
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  16. #16
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    The D605 is probably the best tire choice for a DP that will see a lot of tarmac use and occasional dirt if the priority is longevity.

  17. #17
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    Default New to me a Serow

    Quote Originally Posted by Twinrider View Post
    The D605 is probably the best tire choice for a DP that will see a lot of tarmac use and occasional dirt if the priority is longevity.
    Thatís good to know👍.
    Any idea on average how many kilometers I might get out of a set of tires thinking that Iím on tarmac 70% of the time?
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

  18. #18
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    I'm not sure as I haven't used them for a while, but they were OEM on Honda's XR250 for years and that's their reputation. Bridgestone Trailwings look similar but the compound is harder so while they last longer the dirt grip isn't as good and they will cause low sides without warning. They're OEM on the Serow 250, which is how I found that out...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by racer162 View Post
    That’s good to know��.
    Any idea on average how many kilometers I might get out of a set of tires thinking that I’m on tarmac 70% of the time?
    about 4~5K per set depending on how you ride..

  20. #20
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    Default New to me a Serow

    4-5k good info so about 6 months lol.
    Guess Iíll start finding out after I get the electrical/CDI taken care of👍 looking forward to it
    Getting to the Summit is Optional, Returning home is mandatory
    Life begins at 155mph

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