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Thread: CBR 400 as track tool

  1. #1
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    Default CBR 400 as track tool

    So is it worth acquiring a 1993 CBR 400 as a means of cheap track fun? If so, do they still get support from the aftermarket world? Are they easy to modify, maintain, etc? Thanks for your help.
    On a Japanese road near you!

  2. #2
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    How much can you spend.

    A 400 is cool but a 600 is better.
    I wish to have no connection with any bike that does not ride fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.
    -John Solo Jones-

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    I like 600's as well, I have one, just never ridden one of these, they seem like it would be loads of fun to take one to the track; Have an opportunity to acquire one for dirt cheap!
    On a Japanese road near you!

  4. #4

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    if I was going to go the 400 route, I would seriously look into the VFR/RVF 400's. the V4 made a bit more useable power then the I4's on the CBR. Plus you get the ultra cool single sided swinger.
    -Rich

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich
    if I was going to go the 400 route, I would seriously look into the VFR/RVF 400's. the V4 made a bit more useable power then the I4's on the CBR. Plus you get the ultra cool single sided swinger.
    I could,'t agree more with you, but they still want like $8k for one of those
    Poor man rules would ahve to do
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    Quote Originally Posted by trickyrickyrican
    Have an opportunity to acquire one for dirt cheap!
    A dirt-cheap CBR400 is an excellent choice for a track toy. Any dirt-cheap track toy is an excellent choice actually. :mrgreen:

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by trickyrickyrican

    I could,'t agree more with you, but they still want like $8k for one of those
    Poor man rules would ahve to do
    if you are not afraid of turning a wrench (and I know you are not wanting an old pos for a track whore) The U-media Shonan junkyard has a VFR400 with 20k for 260,000 or something around that. It looks as though it had a lowside, and the fairings are scraped up. But mechanically it's sound.
    -Rich

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    Even on Yahoo they can be had for a lot less than 8K...

    http://page2.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/b69367895

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich
    if I was going to go the 400 route, I would seriously look into the VFR/RVF 400's. the V4 made a bit more useable power then the I4's on the CBR. Plus you get the ultra cool single sided swinger.
    Very untrue.

    The CBR400 rocks as a track toy. It doesn't have a lot of power, but it corners incredibly well. It probably wouldn't be as fun at big tracks like Motegi, but you will have a blast at any of the smaller tracks like Tsukuba or Ebisu.

    You can ride with the throttle wide open and have a lot of fun with the bike without it biting you. It's very forgiving. Awesome corner speed.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by teamanimal
    Very untrue.

    The CBR400 rocks as a track toy. It doesn't have a lot of power, but it corners incredibly well. It probably wouldn't be as fun at big tracks like Motegi, but you will have a blast at any of the smaller tracks like Tsukuba or Ebisu.

    You can ride with the throttle wide open and have a lot of fun with the bike without it biting you. It's very forgiving. Awesome corner speed.
    I am not doubting the power of the CBR400, nor it's prowis as a track toy. I just remember reading somewhere that the VFR made a more useable torque curve, and had a better ballance because of the engine configuration.

    But then again, this is just second hand knowlege from the backlog of crap in my hed. :badgrin:
    -Rich

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    Good points from everybody.

    Torn between thos etwo points excactly. But, aftermarket support plays a key role if I'm to use any of these bikes. That's were I need to commit most of my research time. Who/ where are the parts, shops, etc.
    On a Japanese road near you!

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    i think youll soon get sick of having dudes, blast by you coming into corners, going out of corners and just about everywhere else on the track. disparity in speed is a serious safety issue. motegi and fuji that are both long tracks do nothing to classify riders by their times. tsukuba does though. if you buy the 400 that is where you should focus.

    as far as safety goes you would be better off with a 600.

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    LISTEN TO BLOB :!exclaim:
    I wish to have no connection with any bike that does not ride fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.
    -John Solo Jones-

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    Not sure on this but Bridgestone days require bikes over 600cc?

    -same weight

    -400 wheels/tires narrower/lighter
    -400 shorter wheelbase
    -400 lower seat height
    -400 way more used parts on Yahoo! Auction (mostly street parts)

    -600 twice the power
    -600 modern suspension
    -600 actaul and latest race tires
    -600 much better aftermarket support for race stuff
    Neil

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    Pretty sure you are correct on that Neil. I think Satosan said this to me when I was wanting to get my VFR to a Bridgestone track day. I have to say though, of the bikes I have owned, the VFR400 was my fave. On a small course with no huge straights it's a gem. The 400's are also bikes that you need the right size body for. They seem to be built for the small framed Japanese, or in my case Spaniard!

  16. #16

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    I guess it depends on what your goals are for being at the track.

    If you are out there to have fun, learn and improve your riding, but on a budget, then the 400cc bikes are great. Your tires don't cost as much and they should last longer, not that the 600cc bikes tear them up like the 1000cc bikes do, but still.

    The VFR400 is a great bike, as long as you are not tall, but the 18" wheel thing sucks for tire choice, and putting 17" wheels on then has you smacking the tarmac with the side of the fairings in corners.

    The RVF is a GREAT bike, but, like you say, they are still expensive. The CB400 is cheap, goes well, has a ton of aftermarket parts and used parts on auction, and it is naked, so when you drop it, you don't have scads of plastic to fix :razz:

    If guys blowing by you on GSXR1000 will be a problem with your ego, then you should get one of those and give it a go, I guess, make sure your medical and life insurance are up to date :mrgreen:

    Cheers!
    Never be afraid to try something new! Remember, the ark was built by one amateur, the Titanic was built by thousands of professionals.

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    the whole point of not riding a 400 is safety it has nothing to do with ego.

    there are serious safety issues for both riders. there is nothing i like seeing less than clowns on 400s sitting on the race line just having a good time in race practice days. and as they are in the severe minority i would say that my feelings are held by the majority of track riders.

    can you see the problem with a bike that tops on the back straight at motegi at about 200 and another bike that will hit about 270 by the 200m braking marker being on the track at the same time??

    just look at the number of crashes and even deathes that have happened at motetai. a vast majority of these multi bike accidents are the result of speed discrepancy.

    and even besides that, if you cant be on the race line and are constantly waiting for the next buzzing. what fun can there be in that??

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    Quote Originally Posted by theblob
    the whole point of not riding a 400 is safety it has nothing to do with ego.

    there are serious safety issues for both riders. there is nothing i like seeing less than clowns on 400s sitting on the race line just having a good time in race practice days. and as they are in the severe minority i would say that my feelings are held by the majority of track riders.

    can you see the problem with a bike that tops on the back straight at motegi at about 200 and another bike that will hit about 270 by the 200m braking marker being on the track at the same time??

    just look at the number of crashes and even deathes that have happened at motetai. a vast majority of these multi bike accidents are the result of speed discrepancy.

    and even besides that, if you cant be on the race line and are constantly waiting for the next buzzing. what fun can there be in that??
    Seems to me that Motegi, and any other circuit for that matter, that don't differentiate between 400s and 1000s are inviting disaster. Having said that, at Suzuka there is the 2S(125-250 gp bikes, 250-400 street bikes) class and 2B(600 up) class, but, there are also mixed 2B/2S practice sessions.

    I think, as far as the circuit is concerned, the ultimate responsibility lies with the faster rider to be able to identify a slower rider on approach and make adjustments accordingly to ensure the safety of both. It is, after all,
    a practice session, not the race, and there will be other opportunities to get that "perfect lap". Even during a race there are times when riders hit false neutrals, fuck up braking, anynumber of circumstances that mean they might be well down on speed compared to the guy coming up behind them so it is to be expected to a certain extent.

    But I could see how it might be annoying being re-overtaken mid corner by a clown on a smaller capacity machine ;)
    Rather the fool that knows he's a fool than the fool that thinks he's wise.

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    the ultimate responsibility lies with the faster rider to be able to identify a slower rider on approach and make adjustments accordingly to ensure the safety of both.
    quite right, but accidents happen, nobody wants to T-bone someone. the question of responsibility is not really the point though. the point is you reduce the risks of this kind of accident by buying a larger capacity motorcycle.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by theblob
    the ultimate responsibility lies with the faster rider to be able to identify a slower rider on approach and make adjustments accordingly to ensure the safety of both.
    quite right, but accidents happen, nobody wants to T-bone someone. the question of responsibility is not really the point though. the point is you reduce the risks of this kind of accident by buying a larger capacity motorcycle.
    I don't think that this a 100% true statement. You can T-bone someone regardless of bike size. Any number of reasons come to mind on why would you T-bone someone, including the rider doing the T-boning (what a word!). Bike size should reflect the rider's abilities and or desire to go fast and in which way to go fast, we all know that because you can hit 270 on a straight line doesn't necessarily mean faster on a turn. Maybe one's interst is to improve corner speeds without the additional burden of extra horsepower to get in the way of your confidence.
    That tracks do not govern over what class or type of bike hit the track at the same time, you can bring that to the organizers, not the rider's fault. That is piss poor, I do agree with you on that, yes the faster rider has a lot on his/her shoulders, but there's a reason why most organisations have a minimum qualifying time for class and track.
    Come to find out, running a 400 is not going to be cheaper than my 600, even when my 600 doesn't even have a working engine right now . That was the whole point of considering a 400, economics. Took my R-1 to the track twice, I don't think I like riding a big bike, I guess I got used to accelerate in mid turn rather than squaring turns, I haven't given up yet... Thanks for all the replies, good info on you guys point of views.
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